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In her speech Wednesday night in New York, Ursula K. Le Guin declared, "The name of our beautiful reward is not profit. Its name is freedom." Robin Marchant/Getty Images hide caption

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Robin Marchant/Getty Images

Agatha Christie, seen here in 1946, removes a book from the shelf at Greenway House, the home from which Jennifer Grant bought the trunk six decades later at an estate sale. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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AFP/Getty Images

Nicholas Sparks attends the Professional Bull Riders 2014 Monster Energy Invitational VIP Party. A film adaptation of Sparks' novel The Best of Me is scheduled to be in theaters on Oct. 17. Cindy Ord/Getty Images hide caption

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Cindy Ord/Getty Images

Amazon recently premiered its new dramedy Transparent. The massive retailer is banking on its original TV content to rope in new customers. Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Amazon Studios hide caption

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Charley Gallay/Getty Images for Amazon Studios

Amazon's Original Content Primes The Pump For Bigger Sales

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos introduces the new Amazon Fire phone June 18 in Seattle. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Is Amazon's Failed Phone A Cautionary Tale?

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Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos wants to sell all e-books for $9.99, while the publisher Hachette wants to vary the prices. iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

In E-Book Price War, Amazon's Long-Term Strategy Requires Short-Term Risks

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Nancy Becker, an Amazon employee in Bad Hersfeld, Germany, speaks at a protest rally outside the company's headquarters in Seattle in December. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Amazon's German Workers Push For Higher Wages, Union Contract

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