Beer Beer

Left: A bartender at Hops & Barley brew pub pours a pint of beer in Berlin, Germany. Right: A portrait of Martin Luther. The protest that Luther launched 500 years ago not only revamped how Europe worshiped, but also how it drank. He and his followers promoted hops in beer as an act of rebellion against the Catholic Church. left: Adam Berry Right: Ullstein bild via/Getty Images hide caption

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left: Adam Berry Right: Ullstein bild via/Getty Images

Brewster the Brewery Cat, of The Guardian Brewing Co. in Muncie, Ind., is a husky, middle-aged, orange Creamsicle–colored feline who enjoys tuna and sleeping in cardboard boxes. Courtesy of Distillery Cats/Julia Kuo hide caption

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Courtesy of Distillery Cats/Julia Kuo

Medusa Brewing Company co-founder Keith Sullivan checks on the beer in the brewing area. "There are very few big breweries that have this family, community, connected feel. That's what we're selling," he says. Courtesy of Medusa Brewing Company/Elise Meader hide caption

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Courtesy of Medusa Brewing Company/Elise Meader

The Next Big Thing In Beer Is Being A Small Taproom

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After a series of big tremors last August, Norcia's small community of Benedictine monks sought shelter on the mountainside high above the town. An earthquake devastated the town, seen here from the mountainside, in October. Sylvia Poggioli/NPR hide caption

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Sylvia Poggioli/NPR

Beer-Brewing Monks Are Helping Rebuild Earthquake-Devastated Town In Italy

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A group of men with full glasses proudly pose with their keg of beer in San Francisco, 1895. Underwood Archives/Getty Images hide caption

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Underwood Archives/Getty Images

How The Story Of Beer Is The Story Of America

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Patrick McGovern, scientific director of the Biomolecular Archaeology Project at the University of Pennsylvania Museum, delves into the early history of fermentation in his latest book. Courtesy of Alison Dunlap hide caption

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Courtesy of Alison Dunlap

From left, Von Humbolt's Natur wasser, named after the German explorer and naturalist; Blood & Sand, inspired by silent movie star Rudolph Valentino; and a single malt by Macallan in collaboration with artist Steven Klein. Courtesy of Tamworth Distilling, Samuel Adams and The Macallan hide caption

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Courtesy of Tamworth Distilling, Samuel Adams and The Macallan

Doctors have known for a long time that alcohol consumption can cause heart problems. Researchers in Germany used the Oktoberfest beer festival to link binge drinking to abnormal heart rhythms. Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Herrick/Lonely Planet Images/Getty Images

Sunn O)))'s Greg Anderson (center) mugs with brewers from Right Proper, Stone and Pen Druid to make "Soused," a beer inspired by the drone-metal band's collaboration with Scott Walker. Clarissa Villondo /Karlin Villondo Photography hide caption

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Clarissa Villondo /Karlin Villondo Photography