Beer Beer

Clean Water Services held a brewing competition in Sept. 2014, inviting 13 homebrewers to make beer from its purified wastewater (as well as water from other sources). Now the company is asking the state for permission for brewers to use its wastewater product exclusively to make beer. /Courtesy of Clean Water Services hide caption

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/Courtesy of Clean Water Services

Allagash Brewing microbiologist and head of quality control Zach Bodah's favorite microscope picture of Brettanomyces (taken in house). The culture comes from Confluence Ale and is a blend of the Allagash house yeast and Brett yeast. Courtesy of Zach Bodah/Allagash hide caption

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Courtesy of Zach Bodah/Allagash

Chris Lohring founded Notch Brewing in 2010. The company's lineup includes a Czech pilsner, a Belgian saison and an India pale ale. All of the brews are session beers — meaning their alcohol by volume, or A.B.V., is less than 5 percent. Courtesy of Notch Brewing hide caption

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Courtesy of Notch Brewing

More Drinking, Less Buzz: Session Beers Gain Fans

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In some parts of the U.S., Starbucks is testing a latte flavored with roasted-stout notes along with its seasonal autumn drinks such as the Pumpkin Spice Latte, seen here at front. Starbucks hide caption

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Starbucks

People wearing traditional Bavarian clothes take a break after the Oktoberfest parade in Munich Sunday. Millions of beer drinkers from around the world will visit the Bavarian capital over the next two weeks for the festival. Michael Dalder/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Michael Dalder/Reuters /Landov

Visitors look at old boil tanks at the Heineken Experience in Amsterdam last month. As it celebrates 150 years of brewing, Heineken has also reportedly rejected a takeover offer from SABMiller. Lex Van Lieshout/EPA/LANDOV hide caption

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Lex Van Lieshout/EPA/LANDOV

Before opening a plant in North Carolina in early 2014, Sierra Nevada took water samples from all over the region and analyzed them. It realized it needed to add salt and prepare for fermentation. Steve R/Flickr hide caption

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Steve R/Flickr

Craft Brewers Tweak N.C. Water To Match Western Mountain Flavor

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