Beer Beer

At Anise, a bar in Beirut, Lebanon, beloved local herbs like za'atar, sage and rosemary are making their way into cocktails. "We want to do something fresh in our cocktails," says co-owner Marwan Matar. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

Put An Herb In It: Lebanon's Fresh Approach To Beer And Cocktails

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The Smuttynose Towle Farm brewery in Hampton, N.H., has an invisible but tight envelope that keeps the interior temperature consistently cool or warm, prevents energy loss and ultimately saves money. Courtesy of Smuttynose Brewing Company hide caption

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Courtesy of Smuttynose Brewing Company

Central Michigan University has announced a new certificate program in "fermentation science," and James Holton's company, Mountain Town Station Brewing Co., will help give CMU students hands-on brewing experience. Steve Jessmore/Central Michigan University via AP hide caption

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Steve Jessmore/Central Michigan University via AP

Aspiring Craft Brewers Hit The Books To Pick Up Science Chops

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Brewers pay a federal tax on each barrel of beer they produce. Two proposals on Capitol Hill would lower that tax for small brewers, but not everyone's on board. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

A Craft Beer Tax Battle Is Brewing On Capitol Hill

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Clean Water Services held a brewing competition in Sept. 2014, inviting 13 homebrewers to make beer from its purified wastewater (as well as water from other sources). Now the company is asking the state for permission for brewers to use its wastewater product exclusively to make beer. /Courtesy of Clean Water Services hide caption

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/Courtesy of Clean Water Services

Allagash Brewing microbiologist and head of quality control Zach Bodah's favorite microscope picture of Brettanomyces (taken in house). The culture comes from Confluence Ale and is a blend of the Allagash house yeast and Brett yeast. Courtesy of Zach Bodah/Allagash hide caption

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Courtesy of Zach Bodah/Allagash

Chris Lohring founded Notch Brewing in 2010. The company's lineup includes a Czech pilsner, a Belgian saison and an India pale ale. All of the brews are session beers — meaning their alcohol by volume, or A.B.V., is less than 5 percent. Courtesy of Notch Brewing hide caption

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Courtesy of Notch Brewing

More Drinking, Less Buzz: Session Beers Gain Fans

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In some parts of the U.S., Starbucks is testing a latte flavored with roasted-stout notes along with its seasonal autumn drinks such as the Pumpkin Spice Latte, seen here at front. Starbucks hide caption

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Starbucks

People wearing traditional Bavarian clothes take a break after the Oktoberfest parade in Munich Sunday. Millions of beer drinkers from around the world will visit the Bavarian capital over the next two weeks for the festival. Michael Dalder/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Michael Dalder/Reuters /Landov