Beer Beer

Jana Krocakova and Petra Plankova of Mamma HELP show off their new brew aimed at helping breast cancer patients undergoing chemo to "feel normal" and overcome their impaired sense of taste. Elizabeth Zahradnicek-Haas hide caption

toggle caption
Elizabeth Zahradnicek-Haas

Some beer makers are excited about the possibility of using modified yeast to flavor beer instead of hops, which require a lot of water to grow. Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF hide caption

toggle caption
Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF

Mexicali Resiste members chat outside their encampment in front of Baja California's government offices in Mexicali. From left to right, Alberto Salcido, Francisco Javier Trujillo, Mauricio Villa, Jesus Galaz Duarte and Jorge Benitez. Alex Zaragoza hide caption

toggle caption
Alex Zaragoza

Andrea Stanley of Valley Malt in Hadley, Mass., steeps small amounts of malt as part of the international Pink Boots Collaboration Brew Day, an event meant to highlight women's growing influence on the beer industry. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

toggle caption
Jesse Costa/WBUR

Fresh and dried yeast. It might not look like much, but it has shaped the way we eat and live, according to a new book. Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images

Magdalena Neuner of Germany enjoys a glass of Erdinger nonalcoholic beer after a medal ceremony at the biathlon world championships in Ruhpolding, Germany, in 2012. Today's Olympians have been swept up in a new trend largely emerging from Bavaria: nonalcoholic athletic recovery beers. Alexander Hassenstein/Bongarts/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Alexander Hassenstein/Bongarts/Getty Images

Beyond ingredients and recipes, Guinness has used aggressive exporting and clever marketing to become a global brand. Jirka Matousek/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Jirka Matousek/Flickr

Behind The Genius Of Guinness, Ireland's Most Popular Tourist Attraction

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/577654344/577969877" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A head of poor-quality malt barley taken directly from a field in Power, Mont. Heat and a lack of water resulted in small and light kernels. Grain rejected for malt barley often ends up as animal feed. Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network hide caption

toggle caption
Tony Bynum/Food & Environment Reporting Network

A fridge holds Anheuser-Busch's Budweiser and Grupo Modelo's Corona Light beers. Lawmakers are touting craft breweries as the winners from the tax cuts, but public health officials are concerned about lost tax revenues and rising public costs. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Raedle/Getty Images

For craft breweries, the Senate's tax code overhaul could be very good for business. The plan includes a provision that would save alcohol producers $4.2 billion from 2018 to 2019. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Scott Olson/Getty Images

Left: A bartender at Hops & Barley brew pub pours a pint of beer in Berlin, Germany. Right: A portrait of Martin Luther. The protest that Luther launched 500 years ago not only revamped how Europe worshiped, but also how it drank. He and his followers promoted hops in beer as an act of rebellion against the Catholic Church. left: Adam Berry Right: Ullstein bild via/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
left: Adam Berry Right: Ullstein bild via/Getty Images