Beer Beer

The barley used to make beer as we know it may take a hit under climate change, but growers say they are already preparing by planting it farther north in colder locations. Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dean Hutton/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The cost of a pint of beer could rise sharply in the U.S. and other countries because of increased risks from heat and drought, according to a new study that looks at climate change's possible effects on barley crops. Peter Nicholls/Reuters hide caption

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Peter Nicholls/Reuters

Allagash employees Salim Raal, left, and Brendan McKay stack bottles of Golden Brett, a limited release beer fermented with a house strain of Brettanomyces yeast. The Maine brewery recently installed solar panels as part of its sustainability initiatives. Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images hide caption

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Derek Davis/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images

Double Mountain Brewery founder Matt Swihart grabs freshly bottled pale ale from the bottling line in Hood River. The ale is among the first to be sold in Oregon's new refillable beer bottles. Cassandra Profita/OPB/Earthfix hide caption

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Cassandra Profita/OPB/Earthfix

Beer bottles with crowned caps crowd the conveyor belts of a filling plant in the Veltins brewery in Meschede-Grevenstein, western Germany, in January. Rainer Jensen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rainer Jensen/AFP/Getty Images

Uh-Oh, Germany Is Rapidly Running Out Of Beer Bottles

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Pints of Guinness stouts are lined up at one of the outdoor bars at the new brewery. Guinness, famous for making stout beer, opened a new brewery in Maryland this week. It's the first time Guinness has had a brewery in the U.S. in more than 60 years. Emily Bogle/NPR hide caption

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Emily Bogle/NPR

Guinness Opens Its First U.S. Brewery In 64 Years

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Jana Krocakova and Petra Plankova of Mamma HELP show off their new brew aimed at helping breast cancer patients undergoing chemo to "feel normal" and overcome their impaired sense of taste. Elizabeth Zahradnicek-Haas hide caption

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Elizabeth Zahradnicek-Haas

Some beer makers are excited about the possibility of using modified yeast to flavor beer instead of hops, which require a lot of water to grow. Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF hide caption

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Mint Images/Getty Images/Mint Images RF

Mexicali Resiste members chat outside their encampment in front of Baja California's government offices in Mexicali. From left to right, Alberto Salcido, Francisco Javier Trujillo, Mauricio Villa, Jesus Galaz Duarte and Jorge Benitez. Alex Zaragoza hide caption

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Alex Zaragoza

Andrea Stanley of Valley Malt in Hadley, Mass., steeps small amounts of malt as part of the international Pink Boots Collaboration Brew Day, an event meant to highlight women's growing influence on the beer industry. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Fresh and dried yeast. It might not look like much, but it has shaped the way we eat and live, according to a new book. Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images hide caption

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Maximilian Stock Ltd./Getty Images

Magdalena Neuner of Germany enjoys a glass of Erdinger nonalcoholic beer after a medal ceremony at the biathlon world championships in Ruhpolding, Germany, in 2012. Today's Olympians have been swept up in a new trend largely emerging from Bavaria: nonalcoholic athletic recovery beers. Alexander Hassenstein/Bongarts/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Hassenstein/Bongarts/Getty Images

Beyond ingredients and recipes, Guinness has used aggressive exporting and clever marketing to become a global brand. Jirka Matousek/Flickr hide caption

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Jirka Matousek/Flickr

Behind The Genius Of Guinness, Ireland's Most Popular Tourist Attraction

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