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Portrait of American social worker Jane Addams (1860 - 1935), early 1900s. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images) Hulton Archive/Getty Images hide caption

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Hulton Archive/Getty Images

When A Name Doesn't Quite Fit

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Former House Speaker Dennis Hastert leaves the Dirksen Federal Court House in a wheelchair after his sentencing on April 27, 2016 in Chicago, Ill. Hastert was sentenced to 15 months in prison and ordered to pay $250,000 to a victim's fund for breaking banking laws; he had paid hush money to conceal his decades-old sexual abuse of a 14-year-old. Joshua Lott/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/Getty Images

Puerto Rican nationalist Oscar López Rivera gestures as he is released Wednesday from house arrest in San Juan, Puerto Rico, after 36 years in custody. Carlos Giusti/AP hide caption

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Carlos Giusti/AP

Chicago's Fire Department has only half as many ambulances as it has fire vehicles, but it gets 20 times more medical calls than fire calls these days. Monica Eng/WBEZ hide caption

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Monica Eng/WBEZ

Why Send A Firetruck To Do An Ambulance's Job?

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Parents, students and supporters of Chicago Public Schools teachers gather at a press conference in 2016 near Mayor Rahm Emanuel's home. Jose M. Osorio/Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Jose M. Osorio/Chicago Tribune/Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images

Chicago police announced on Sunday the arrest of a 14-year-old boy in connection with the sexual assault of a 15-year-old girl that was streamed live on Facebook. Above, Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson talks to reporters at the scene of a triple shooting in the North Lawndale neighborhood in February. Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joshua Lott/AFP/Getty Images

If Chicago, the fifth most racially and economically segregated city in the country, were to lower its level of segregation to the national median of the 100 largest metropolitan areas in the country, it would have a profound impact on the entire region. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Jerusha Hodge is among the handful of CeaseFire outreach workers who work to curtail violence in three South Side Chicago neighborhoods. Hodge says shootings are down in the areas where CeaseFire has a presence. Cheryl Corley/NPR hide caption

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Cheryl Corley/NPR

Treat Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis, One Program Says

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A Caterpillar excavator operates on a construction site in Miami Beach, Fla. Wilfredo Lee/AP hide caption

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Wilfredo Lee/AP

When Caterpillar Leaves Peoria, What Will Become Of The Town?

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There was a huge jump last year in the number of murders in Chicago. As young people are affected by the gun violence, community leaders look for answers. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

In Bid To Curb Violence, Chicago Gets Some Ideas From Teens Behind Bars

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Chicago police officials ride bikes by a broadcast of President Trump's inaugural address on Jan. 20. The president has threatened to "send in the Feds" to intervene in the city's law enforcement. Nam Y. Huh/AP hide caption

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Nam Y. Huh/AP

Attorney General Loretta Lynch, in Chicago on Friday, announces the release of a Department of Justice report citing widespread abuses by officers in the Chicago Police Department. The report is the result of a 13-month investigation. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

President Obama waves to supporters at an election night party in Chicago to proclaim victory in the 2012 presidential election. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

Before Farewell Speech, Chicagoans Reflect On President Obama's Legacy

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A screenshot shows the Chicago Police Department's Wednesday news conference, where Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson (left) discussed a violent attack that was live-streamed on Facebook. Johnson called the assault "sickening." Courtesy of Chicago Police Department hide caption

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Courtesy of Chicago Police Department

Employees hand-finish cheesecakes on the production line at Eli's in Chicago. Deborah Amos/NPR hide caption

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Deborah Amos/NPR

Refugees Resettled In Chicago Help Make Its Most Famous Cheesecake

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