Japan Japan

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe and South Korean President Park Geun-hye walk to their seats for the start of a trilateral meeting with the U.S. in 2014. Japan and Korea's leaders have yet to meet one-on-one. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

For China, Japan And S. Korea, Just Meeting Is An Accomplishment

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Demonstrators rally against Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's controversial security bills in front of the National Diet in Tokyo in September. The bills, which passed, will allow Japan to send its troops overseas for the first time since World War II. However, the likelihood of Japanese involvement in a foreign war appears quite small. Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images

Japan Can Now Send Its Military Abroad, But Will It?

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A baptism ceremony for a child on Ikitsuki Island, Nagasaki prefecture. After Japan's military ruler banned Christianity in the late 1500s, many Christians went underground, holding services such as these in their homes. Courtesy of Shimano-yakata Museum, Ikitsuki hide caption

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Courtesy of Shimano-yakata Museum, Ikitsuki

Driven Underground Years Ago, Japan's 'Hidden Christians' Maintain Faith

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3 Scientists Awarded Nobel Prize In Physiology Or Medicine

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A young woman holds a placard protesting against controversial military reform bills outside Japan's parliament in Tokyo, Japan, on Friday. Lawmakers passed two measures to expand the role of Japan's military for the first time since World War II. Franck Robichon/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Franck Robichon/EPA/Landov

Floodwaters from the burst Kinugawa River (left) flow into a residential area (right) in Joso, Ibaraki Prefecture, on Thursday. The city is northeast of Tokyo. Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images

Dylan Rodenhaber (18) of the Red Land team of Lewisberry, Pa., waits to shake hands with players on Tokyo's Kitasuna team after the Little League World Series Championship game Sunday in South Williamsport, Pa. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Musashi Fuchu Little League baseball players spend eight to 10 hours a day on weekends practicing on this field on the outskirts of Tokyo. This traditional powerhouse team has won the Little League World Series twice before, in 2013 and 2003, but did not qualify this season. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

The Secret To Japan's Little League Success: 10-Hour Practices

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Lt. Col. Kris Roberts served as a facilities maintenance officer at Marine Corps Air Station Futenma in Okinawa, Japan in the 1980s. Courtesy of Lt. Col. Kris Roberts hide caption

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Courtesy of Lt. Col. Kris Roberts

U.S. Compensates Marine Exposed To Toxic Chemicals In '80s

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Japan's Emperor Akihito delivers his remarks with Empress Michiko during a memorial service at Nippon Budokan martial arts hall in Tokyo, on Saturday. His expression of "deep remorse" for Japan's wartime past is seen as an unprecedented apology. Shizuo Kambayashi/AP hide caption

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Shizuo Kambayashi/AP

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe bows after delivering an address marking the 70th anniversary of World War II's end for his country. Abe noted Japan's continued grief over the war, but he also said future generations shouldn't be compelled to apologize for the war. Toru Hanai/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Toru Hanai/Reuters /Landov

A man pushes a loaded bicycle down a cleared path in a flattened area of Nagasaki more than a month after the nuclear attack in 1945. Stanley Troutman/AP hide caption

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Stanley Troutman/AP

Remembering The Horror Of Nagasaki 70 Years Later

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