Japan Japan

Police officers search for a 7-year-old boy in the mountains of Hokkaido, where he went missing after his parents said they left him alone temporarily as a punishment. The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

Survivors of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare are seen as they await emergency medical treatment in Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945. AP hide caption

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AP

After Hiroshima Bombing, Survivors Sorted Through The Horror

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Kikue Takagi, left, narrowly survived the Hiroshima atomic bombing as a schoolgirl. She's now 83. Her second cousin is U.S. Rep. Mark Takano, a Democrat from southern California. His grandparents and parents were all placed in U.S. internment camps in World War II. In this photo from last year, they are at a restaurant in Hiroshima, where he visited her. Courtesy of Mark Takano hide caption

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Courtesy of Mark Takano

President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe lay wreaths at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima on Friday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama's Full Remarks At Hiroshima

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Visitors shelter from the rain under the Peace Flame as they visit the Memorial Park and the nearby Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum on April 21 in Hiroshima, Japan. The dome in the background was destroyed during the attack, and preserved as a monument. The park, museum and dome are dedicated to the victims of the world's first nuclear attack, and to the pursuit of peace. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

This photo dated April 1977 shows Megumi Yokota, who was kidnapped by North Korean agents later the same year. Megumi was one of eight Japanese nationals who Pyongyang confirmed were dead in 2002. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il apologized for the kidnapping at an historic meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP/Getty Images

Relatives Of Japanese Taken By North Korea Still Hope To Find Loved Ones

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Rescue dogs are brought in for the searching operation on Saturday in Mashiki, Kumamoto, Japan. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images

President Obama bows as he greets Japanese Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko at the Imperial Palace in Tokyo in 2009. The president travels to Japan next month and there's speculation he might visit Hiroshima, the site of the world's first atomic bombing. Charles Dharapak/AP hide caption

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Charles Dharapak/AP

In a photo from March 2011, then-U.S. Ambassador to Japan John Roos visits the Tohoku region, hardest hit by the tsunami and earthquake. He and his team then started the Tomodachi (Friends) Initiative to help young survivors. Ben Chang/Courtesy of John Roos hide caption

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Ben Chang/Courtesy of John Roos

After Tsunami And Quake, A U.S.-Japan Partnership To 'Give Hope'

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Elderly women walk together down a road lined with temporary homes in Fukushima prefecture, two hours from the radiation-affected coast. Kosuke Okahara for NPR hide caption

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Kosuke Okahara for NPR

5 Years After Japan Disasters, 'Temporary' Housing Is Feeling Permanent

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Six of Damine's 10 remaining children perform in the finale of the village's annual kabuki festival. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

As A Japanese Mountain Village Shrinks, So Do Its Prospects For Kabuki

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