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Journalists gather at the main gate of a care center where a knife-wielding man went on a rampage in the city of Sagamihara, west of Tokyo on Tuesday. Toshifumki Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Toshifumki Kitamura/AFP/Getty Images

A first-timer's attempt at making part of a 'character bento,' or Kyaraben, lunch. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

For Japanese Parents, Gorgeous Bento Lunches Are Packed With High Stakes

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A Japanese mother and her 2-year-old pick up free groceries in Tokyo at the charity Second Harvest. Japan has a limited safety net for the poor and the economy is still struggling to gain traction under Prime Minister Shinzo Abe. Elise Hu/NPR hide caption

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Elise Hu/NPR

Halfway Around The World, Brexit Hits Japan's Already Soft Economy

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Demonstrators hold placards that read "Withdraw Marine Corps" during a rally against the US military presence in Naha, Okinawa prefecture on Sunday, following the alleged rape and murder of a local woman by a former U.S. marine employed on the U.S. military base. Toru Yamanaka /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Toru Yamanaka /AFP/Getty Images

Japan's Self-Defense Forces, whose vehicles are seen here during the search for a young boy on Japan's northern island of Hokkaido, reportedly found a small boy who identified himself as the boy they'd been looking for since Saturday. Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jiji Press/AFP/Getty Images

Police officers search for a 7-year-old boy in the mountains of Hokkaido, where he went missing after his parents said they left him alone temporarily as a punishment. The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images hide caption

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The Asahi Shimbun via Getty Images

Survivors of the first atomic bomb ever used in warfare are seen as they await emergency medical treatment in Hiroshima, Japan, in 1945. AP hide caption

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AP

After Hiroshima Bombing, Survivors Sorted Through The Horror

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Kikue Takagi, left, narrowly survived the Hiroshima atomic bombing as a schoolgirl. She's now 83. Her second cousin is U.S. Rep. Mark Takano, a Democrat from southern California. His grandparents and parents were all placed in U.S. internment camps in World War II. In this photo from last year, they are at a restaurant in Hiroshima, where he visited her. Courtesy of Mark Takano hide caption

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Courtesy of Mark Takano

President Obama and Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe lay wreaths at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park in Hiroshima on Friday. Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images

President Obama's Full Remarks At Hiroshima

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Visitors shelter from the rain under the Peace Flame as they visit the Memorial Park and the nearby Hiroshima Peace Memorial Museum on April 21 in Hiroshima, Japan. The dome in the background was destroyed during the attack, and preserved as a monument. The park, museum and dome are dedicated to the victims of the world's first nuclear attack, and to the pursuit of peace. Carl Court/Getty Images hide caption

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Carl Court/Getty Images

This photo dated April 1977 shows Megumi Yokota, who was kidnapped by North Korean agents later the same year. Megumi was one of eight Japanese nationals who Pyongyang confirmed were dead in 2002. North Korean leader Kim Jong-Il apologized for the kidnapping at an historic meeting with Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi. -/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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-/AFP/Getty Images

Relatives Of Japanese Taken By North Korea Still Hope To Find Loved Ones

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Rescue dogs are brought in for the searching operation on Saturday in Mashiki, Kumamoto, Japan. The Asahi Shimbun/The Asahi Shimbun/Getty Images hide caption

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