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New NASA evidence suggests that there's a chemical reaction taking place under the moon's icy surface that could provide conditions for life. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute
Luciano Lozano/Getty Images

A Brighter Outlook Could Translate To A Longer Life

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Proxima Centauri lies in the constellation of Centaurus (The Centaur), just over four light-years from Earth. Although it looks bright through the eye of Hubble, Proxima Centauri is not visible to the naked eye. ESA/Hubble & NASA hide caption

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ESA/Hubble & NASA

When the Galileo spacecraft swooped by Jupiter's frozen moon Europa in Nov. 1997, views of its blistered surface strengthened suspicions that a briny ocean harboring life could lie beneath an icy crust. AP hide caption

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AP

Jeralean Talley addresses the congregation as her pastor, Reverend Dana Darby, holds the microphone for her during a celebration of her 115th birthday. Rebecca Cook/Reuters /Landov hide caption

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Rebecca Cook/Reuters /Landov

From Pork To Onion Sandwiches: Secrets To Supersurvivors' Long Lives

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We think that life came from non-life, from the increasing complexity of chemical reactions between biomolecules present on the primordial Earth. But what about the universe? How did it come to be if there was nothing before? iStockphoto hide caption

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iStockphoto

To children the world is a vast experiment, a laboratory of how things interact with one another. iStockphoto.com hide caption

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iStockphoto.com