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Couples now have intertwined digital lives, and so marital problems can lead to spying through specialized apps, keyboard loggers and GPS tracking technology. Roy Scott/Getty Images hide caption

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Roy Scott/Getty Images

According to family lawyers, scorned spouses are increasingly turning to GPS trackers and cheap spyware apps to watch an ex. Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images hide caption

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Stuart Kinlough/Getty Images

I Know Where You've Been: Digital Spying And Divorce In The Smartphone Age

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"I'd lost 60 pounds in the years since my passport picture had been taken and I hardly looked like myself," writes author Haroon Moghul. "Each time I approached a border, I feared I'd be denied a visa or, worse, deported." Mark Airs/Ikon Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Airs/Ikon Images/Getty Images

An Encounter At A Passport Checkpoint Offers Respite From Depression's Grip

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Activists hold signs during a protest against "triple talaq," the practice of instant divorce by Muslim men, in New Delhi on May 10. The country's Supreme Court has outlawed this means of ending a marriage. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

Members of Congress and their staffs seeking health insurance this year could choose from among 57 gold plans (from four insurers) sold on D.C.'s small business marketplace. Zach Gibson/Getty Images hide caption

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Zach Gibson/Getty Images

Seema Parveen, 42, has been divorced by three different men. In India's Muslim community, a husband can divorce his wife by uttering the word "talaq" — Arabic for divorce. Julie McCarthy/NPR hide caption

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Julie McCarthy/NPR

Muslim Women In India Ask Top Court To Ban Instant Divorce

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Melissa Smith (left) offers some advice to Sarah Weeldreyer about amicable divorce. Jody Savage/Courtesy of Melissa Smith and Courtesy of Sarah Weeldreyer hide caption

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Jody Savage/Courtesy of Melissa Smith and Courtesy of Sarah Weeldreyer

Finding A New Kind Of Partnership Through Divorce

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Revisiting A Mother's Day Story Of Separation

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Harrelle Felipa with five of his children and a granddaughter. Jennifer Ludden/NPR hide caption

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Jennifer Ludden/NPR

From Deadbeat To Dead Broke: The 'Why' Behind Unpaid Child Support

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Betty and Jeff Waite enjoy family brunch with their sons. The Waites say they were happily married for 17 years before Jeff told Betty he was questioning his sexuality. The news came as a shock to her, as it does to many men and women who learn their spouse is gay. Cheri Lawson/WNKU hide caption

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Cheri Lawson/WNKU

A Place For Straight Spouses After Their Mate Comes Out Of The Closet

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Cardinal Francesco Coccopalmerio (left), president of the Vatican Pontifical Council for Legislative Texts, arrives to read Pope Francis' statement on marriage annulment reforms at the Vatican on Tuesday. Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andreas Solaro/AFP/Getty Images

Pope Francis Smooths Process To Annul Marriages

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Nuns greet Pope Francis as he arrives to lead the weekly audience in Saint Peter's Square at the Vatican on Thursday. The pope, speaking at his weekly general audience, said sometimes separation is "morally necessary." Tony Gentile/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Tony Gentile/Reuters/Landov

As Gay Marriages Rise, Now Comes The Case For Same-Sex Divorce

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Sara Pisano (left) and Danilo Spagnoli, just married by Pope Francis, smile during the wedding ceremony in St. Peter's Basilica at the Vatican, Sept. 14. Pope Francis married 20 couples on Sunday, including some who already live together or and who already have children, both technically sins in the eyes of the church. Alessandra Tarantino/AP hide caption

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Alessandra Tarantino/AP

In 'Season Of Mercy,' Will Vatican Rethink Communion For Divorcees?

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