Cuba Cuba

Journalists wait for Cuban performance artist Tania Bruguera at Revolution square in Havana, on Wednesday. Adalberto Roque /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Adalberto Roque /AFP/Getty Images

Cuban Authorities Detain Artist, Dissidents, Thwarting Performance

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NPR's Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep interviews President Obama on Dec. 17 in the Oval Office, where they discussed U.S. involvement in the Middle East and the world as a whole. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Waiting For A Break: Obama On 'Strategic Patience' In Foreign Policy

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Morning Edition host Steve Inskeep interviews President Obama on Dec. 17 in the Oval Office, where they discussed recent moves on Cuba and immigration, and prospects for cooperation with a GOP-dominated Congress. Kainaz Amaria/NPR hide caption

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Kainaz Amaria/NPR

Despite Election Defeat, Obama Sees Room To Push His Agenda

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Alan Gross pauses during a news conference at his lawyer's office in Washington on Dec. 17. The federal government will pay him $3.2 million as part of a settlement with the company that employed Gross when he was arrested in Cuba in 2009. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

A member of the activist group Women in White is arrested during a demonstration to commemorate Human Rights Day in downtown Havana, on Dec. 10. Members of the opposition movement say they feel betrayed by the U.S. decision to restore ties with Cuba's communist regime. Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Adalberto Roque/AFP/Getty Images

Cuba's Jews, Catholics Have Very Different Takes On The U.S. Thaw

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In 1959, Fidel Castro imposed a law forbidding the import of foreign cars, so many Cubans drive and maintain older models. Kate Skogen/JetKat Photo hide caption

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Kate Skogen/JetKat Photo

Despite Its Beauty, Cuba Isn't Quite Ready For Tourists

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A tourist takes a cab ride in a classic American car as the driver takes him past the Capitolio in Havana, Cuba on Thursday. Ramon Espinosa/AP hide caption

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Ramon Espinosa/AP

NPR's Michele Kelemen On Morning Edition

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Cubans try to connect to the ETECSA server during a May 9 service outage as they wait with other customers outside the offices of the state telecom monopoly in Havana, Cuba. Cuba's government has blamed technological problems on a U.S. embargo. Critics of the government have said it deliberately strangles the Internet to mute dissent. Changing U.S.-Cuba relations may prove who's right. Franklin Reyes/AP hide caption

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Franklin Reyes/AP

For An Island Trapped In The '50s, An Instant Digital Revolution

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President Obama announces changes to U.S. policy on Cuba, including relaxing restrictions on U.S. banking in the country, in Washington, D.C. on Wednesday. Doug Mills / Pool/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Doug Mills / Pool/EPA/Landov

Opportunity, Caution Seen For U.S. Banks As Cuba Rules Ease

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Cuban President Fidel Castro (left) and Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez in Barinas, Venezuela, in 2000. The two formed a close partnership, which has continued with their successors. However, the prospect of normal ties between the U.S. and Cuba may also have an impact on relations between Cuba and Venezuela. Jose Goitia/AP hide caption

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Jose Goitia/AP

In Latin America, Not Everyone Is Thrilled With The U.S.-Cuba Thaw

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Obama shakes hands with Castro during a memorial service for former South African President Nelson Mandela in Soweto, South Africa, on Dec. 10, 2013. Former Cuban leader Fidel Castro says his brother introduced himself to Obama in English, telling him, "Mr. President, I'm Castro," as the two leaders shook hands. AP hide caption

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AP

Anti-Castro protester Lazaro Lozano (left) argues with an unidentified pro-Obama supporter in the Little Havana area of Miami on Wednesday. Alan Diaz/AP hide caption

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Alan Diaz/AP

NPR's Greg Allen Reports From Miami

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