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(Left) The Apollo 11 command and service modules are mated to the Saturn V lunar module adapter. (Right) The Apollo 11 spacecraft command module is loaded aboard a Super Guppy aircraft at Ellington Air Force Base for shipment to North American Rockwell Corp. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The Making Of Apollo's Command Module: 2 Engineers Recall Tragedy And Triumph

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Astronaut Alan L. Bean holds a container filled with lunar soil collected during the extravehicular activity in which astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Bean, lunar module pilot, participated. Charles Conrad Jr./NASA hide caption

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Charles Conrad Jr./NASA

The spacesuit Neil Armstrong wore on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission 50 years ago. Apollo 11 blasted off for the moon on July 16, 1969, and Armstrong took his famed "giant leap" five days later. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Of Little Details And Lunar Dust: Preserving Neil Armstrong's Apollo 11 Spacesuit

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Gene Kranz stands behind the console at Mission Control in Houston where he worked during the Gemini and Apollo missions. Michael Wyke/AP hide caption

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Michael Wyke/AP

Former NASA Flight Director Gene Kranz Restores Mission Control In Houston

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Visitors look at a model of a Saturn V rocket and its launch umbilical tower, which were used during the Apollo moon-landing program, at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Fifty years ago this July 20, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the moon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine (from left), Sen. Ted Cruz, D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson and Margot Lee Shetterly, author of the book Hidden Figures, unveil the Hidden Figures Way street sign at a dedication ceremony on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. NASA/Joel Kowsky hide caption

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NASA/Joel Kowsky

A stripe of red dots shows the risk corridor for a hypothetical asteroid strike, part of an exercise this week held by planetary defense experts in which they analyze data about a fictitious asteroid. Landsat/Copernicus/Google Earth/Dept. of State Geographer hide caption

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Landsat/Copernicus/Google Earth/Dept. of State Geographer

This Week, NASA Is Pretending An Asteroid Is On Its Way To Smack The Earth

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South Korean President Park Geun-hye walks past a NASA logo during a tour at the agency's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Do You Love Lying In Bed? Get Paid By NASA To Do It For Space Research

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India launched a ballistic missile defense interceptor last week — and NASA says it created dangerous debris in orbit. "We have identified 400 pieces of orbital debris from that one event," NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine said. Handout /Reuters hide caption

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Handout /Reuters

This illustration made available by NASA shows the Kepler space telescope, the planet-hunting spacecraft that launched in 2009. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

Young Astronomer Uses Artificial Intelligence To Discover 2 Exoplanets

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In this photo provided by NASA, the SpaceX Crew Dragon is pictured just beside the International Space Station. SpaceX's new crew capsule arrived at the station on Sunday in a remarkable moment for commercial space exploration. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

In this illustration, SpaceX's Crew Dragon approaches the International Space Station for docking. The capsule has room to carry seven astronauts. SpaceX/NASA hide caption

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SpaceX/NASA

SpaceX Readies For Key Test Of Capsule Built To Carry Astronauts Into Space

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Astronaut Buzz Aldrin walks on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission in 1969. The landing site at Tranquility Base has remained mostly untouched — though that could change as more nations and even commercial companies start to explore the moon. NASA hide caption

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NASA

How Do You Preserve History On The Moon?

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NASA astronaut Anne McClain, attends her final exam at the Gagarin Cosmonauts' Training Centre outside Moscow on Nov. 14, 2018. STR/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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STR/AFP/Getty Images

'Every Day Is A Good Day When You're Floating': Anne McClain Talks Life In Space

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An artist's concept shows a NASA Mars exploration rover on the surface of Mars. The twin rovers Spirit and Opportunity were launched in 2003 and arrived at sites on Mars in January 2004. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Opinion: Good Night Oppy, A Farewell To NASA's Mars Rover

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NASA's Opportunity rover used its navigation camera to capture this northward view of tracks in May 2010 during its long trek to Mars' Endeavour crater. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

NASA's Mars Rover Opportunity Is Officially Declared Dead

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Earth's long-term warming, compared against a base line average from 1951 to 1980, can be seen in this visualization of NASA's global temperature record. Kathryn Mersmann/NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio hide caption

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Kathryn Mersmann/NASA's Scientific Visualization Studio