NASA NASA

Artist's concept of the Parker Solar Probe spacecraft approaching the sun. Launching in 2018, Parker Solar Probe will provide new data on solar activity and make critical contributions to our ability to forecast major space-weather events that impact life on Earth. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

NASA Braves The Heat To Get Up Close And Personal With Our Sun

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/637133541/637230149" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

NASA has named nine astronauts to crew the first test flights and missions of Boeing's CST-100 Starliner and SpaceX's Crew Dragon capsule. From left to right: Sunita Williams, Josh Cassada, Eric Boe, Nicole Mann, Christopher Ferguson, Douglas Hurley, Robert Behnken, Michael Hopkins and Victor Glover. NASA hide caption

toggle caption
NASA

A dust storm has reduced sunlight and visibility on Mars. But NASA's Curiosity rover, seen in a self-portrait taken last week in the Gale Crater, runs on nuclear energy and is powering through. NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL-Caltech via AP

Two rock samples taken by NASA's Curiosity rover were found to contain organic molecules. NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS

NASA's Curiosity Rover Finds Chemical Building Blocks For Life On Mars

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/617235884/618163037" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Astronaut Alan Bean was photographed by Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr., who is reflected in Bean's helmet visor, during the Apollo 12 moonwalk in 1969. Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr./NASA hide caption

toggle caption
Charles "Pete" Conrad Jr./NASA

Alan Bean, Apollo 12 Astronaut Who Walked On The Moon, Dies At 86

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/514228407/614810195" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment Follow-On (GRACE-FO) mission, shown in an artist's rendering, will measure tiny fluctuations in Earth's gravitational field to show how water moves around the planet. NASA/JPL hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL

NASA Launching New Satellites To Measure Earth's Lumpy Gravity

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/612980506/613117673" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The planet, known as Kepler-452b, was believed to be about 60 percent larger than our planet and within the habitable zone of its star. NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle hide caption

toggle caption
NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Earth's 'Bigger, Older Cousin' Maybe Doesn't Even Exist

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/609840337/610529536" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The Atlas V rocket carrying the Mars InSight lander launches from Vandenberg Air Force Base, as seen from the San Gabriel Mountains more than 100 miles away, on Saturday morning. The InSight probe is the first NASA lander designed entirely to study the deep interior structure of Mars. David McNew/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
David McNew/Getty Images

TKTK Vinny Mwano/Courtesy of Inclusive Innovation Incubator hide caption

toggle caption
Vinny Mwano/Courtesy of Inclusive Innovation Incubator

3 Black Teenage Scientists Had A Breakthrough, Then Came The Trolls

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/608558338/608723683" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An artist's rendition of NASA's InSight lander, which is expected to launch on Saturday morning. InSight will monitor the Red Planet's seismic activity and internal temperature. NASA/JPL-CalTech hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/JPL-CalTech

NASA Is Heading Back To Mars To Peer Inside The Red Planet

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/608448614/608583080" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope image of the Lagoon Nebula, which is about 4,000 light-years away. It was taken by Hubble's Wide Field Camera 3 in February. The image was released to celebrate the 28th anniversary of Hubble. NASA, ESA, STScI hide caption

toggle caption
NASA, ESA, STScI

An artist's representation of NASA's Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite, or TESS, observing an M dwarf star with orbiting planets. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center hide caption

toggle caption
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Get Ready For the Next Big Thing In NASA's Search For Earth's Twin

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/602168985/602605372" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lockheed Martin's Quiet Supersonic Technology (QueSST) concept's unique design would allow it to separate the shocks and expansions associated with supersonic flight, resulting in a soft thump rather than a disruptive bang. Courtesy Lockheed Martin hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy Lockheed Martin

NASA Hopes Supersonic X Plane Will Deliver Less Bang For The Buck

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/599754826/599895272" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

This artist's-concept illustration depicts NASA's Psyche spacecraft which will carry a deep-space laser communications system. JPL-Caltech/Arizona State Univ./Space Systems Loral/Peter Rubin/NASA hide caption

toggle caption
JPL-Caltech/Arizona State Univ./Space Systems Loral/Peter Rubin/NASA

Live High Definition Video From Mars? NASA Is Getting Ready

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/592910837/593609991" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript