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NASA astronaut Scott Kelly is seen inside a Soyuz simulator at the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center on March 4 in Star City, Russia. Kelly, along with Russian cosmonaut Mikhail Kornienko of the Russian Federal Space Agency, are scheduled for launch Friday aboard a Soyuz TMA-16M spacecraft from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. NASA/Bill Ingalls hide caption

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NASA/Bill Ingalls

NASA To Study A Twin In Space And His Brother On Earth

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New research suggests that Saturn's tiny moon Enceladus has warm oceans hiding beneath its icy crust. NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute

Researchers Think There's A Warm Ocean On Enceladus

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Astronomers have known about Ceres for centuries, but they don't really know what to make of it. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA hide caption

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Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

NASA Probe Reaches Orbit Around Dwarf Planet

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An image of Ceres taken by NASA's Dawn spacecraft shows that the brightest spot on the dwarf planet has a dimmer companion. NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA/MPS/DLR/IDA

An image taken with the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope of the galaxy cluster SDSS J1038+4849 shows that it seems to be smiling. The space agency says it's the result of a symmetrical alignment of the galaxy cluster and the telescope — along with a powerful gravity field that can bend light. NASA & ESA hide caption

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NASA & ESA

Leland Melvin with his dogs, Jake and Scout. "I snuck them into NASA to get this picture," Melvin says. Courtesy of Leland Melvin hide caption

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Courtesy of Leland Melvin

From Touchdowns To Takeoff: Engineer-Athlete Soared To Space

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