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An artist's impression of a white dwarf in an extremely close orbit around what's believed to be a black hole. The star is so close that much of its material is being pulled away. X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss hide caption

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X-ray: NASA/CXC/University of Alberta/A.Bahramian et al.; Illustration: NASA/CXC/M.Weiss

That's no ravioli! Pan, one of Saturn's moons, bears more than a passing resemblance to a certain stuffed pasta. NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute

An image of Western Hemisphere lightning storms, captured Feb. 14 over the course of one hour. Brighter colors indicate more lightning energy was recorded (the key is in kilowatt-hours of total optical emissions from lightning.) The most powerful storm system is located over the Gulf Coast of Texas. MATLAB/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration hide caption

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MATLAB/National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration

The Women of NASA featured in the Lego set are (left to right): computer scientist Margaret Hamilton, mathematician Katherine Johnson, astronaut Sally Ride, astronaut Mae Jemison and astronomer Nancy Grace Roman. Maia Weinstock hide caption

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Maia Weinstock

A NASA poster imagines what it might be like to "planet hop" from the planet called TRAPPIST-1e, 40 light-years from Earth. NASA-JPL/Caltech hide caption

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NASA-JPL/Caltech

Mae Jemison addresses congressional representatives and distinguished guests at Bayer's Making Science Make Sense 20th anniversary celebration in 2015. Kevin Wolf/AP Images for Bayer Making Science Make Sense hide caption

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Kevin Wolf/AP Images for Bayer Making Science Make Sense

After Making History In Space, Mae Jemison Works To Prime Future Scientists

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This artist's rendering shows what one of the seven planets, TRAPPIST-1f, might look like. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Astronomers Find 7 Earth-Size Planets Around A Nearby Star

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The Apollo 11 command module Columbia sits in the Mary Baker Engen Restoration Hangar in Virginia, where it is undergoing conservation. Dane Penland/National Air and Space Museum/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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Dane Penland/National Air and Space Museum/Smithsonian Institution

SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket sits on the launch pad Saturday at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. SpaceX scrubbed the Saturday launch due to a technical issue. The company is tried again — and succeeded — on Sunday. Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images

An artist's concept shows the WISE spacecraft in its orbit around Earth. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Have Spare Time? Try To Discover A Planet

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SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket is prepared Friday for a launch at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Launch Pad 39A, one of the renovated space shuttle launch pads that SpaceX leases from NASA, has been the site of many of NASA's most famous liftoffs. Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bruce Weaver/AFP/Getty Images

This is the actual NASA graphic illustrating the "Space Poop Challenge." NASA hide caption

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NASA

Space Poop Problem-Solvers Take Home Cash Prizes From NASA

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From left, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae and Taraji P. Henson accept the award for outstanding performance by a cast in a motion picture for Hidden Figures at the 23rd annual Screen Actors Guild Awards on Jan. 29 in Los Angeles. Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP hide caption

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Chris Pizzello/Invision/AP