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Boeing, NASA, and U.S. Army personnel work around the Boeing Starliner spacecraft shortly after it landed in White Sands, N.M., Sunday. Bill Ingalls/AP hide caption

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Bill Ingalls/AP

A photo of the mole on NASA's InSight lander trying to drill into the Martian surface. NASA hide caption

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NASA

A 'Mole' Isn't Digging Mars: NASA Engineers Are Trying To Find Out Why

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Engineer Joel Steinkraus tests solar panels on one of two CubeSats that made up NASA's Mars Cube One mission. The MarCO CubeSats — the first to be sent into deep space — flew to Mars and relayed telemetry from NASA's InSight lander. NASA/JPL-Caltech hide caption

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NASA/JPL-Caltech

Itty-Bitty Satellites Take On Big-Time Science Missions

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Astronauts Christina Koch (right) and Jessica Meir pose for a photo on the International Space Station on Oct. 4. NASA moved up the first all-female spacewalk because of a power system failure at the space station. NASA via AP hide caption

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NASA via AP

A prototype of SpaceX's Starship stands at the company's Texas launch facility on Saturday. The Starship spacecraft is a massive vehicle designed to eventually be able to take people to the moon, Mars and beyond. Loren Elliott/Getty Images hide caption

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Loren Elliott/Getty Images

Some of the space food that was scheduled to be carried on the Apollo 11 lunar landing mission included (from left to right): chicken and vegetables, beef hash, and beef and gravy. Bettmann/Bettmann Archive hide caption

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Bettmann/Bettmann Archive

Greg Force and Abby Force at StoryCorps in Greenville, S.C. Alletta Cooper/StoryCorps hide caption

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Alletta Cooper/StoryCorps

How A 10-Year-Old Boy Helped Apollo 11 Return To Earth

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(Left) The Apollo 11 command and service modules are mated to the Saturn V lunar module adapter. (Right) The Apollo 11 spacecraft command module is loaded aboard a Super Guppy aircraft at Ellington Air Force Base for shipment to North American Rockwell Corp. NASA hide caption

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NASA

The Making Of Apollo's Command Module: 2 Engineers Recall Tragedy And Triumph

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Astronaut Alan L. Bean holds a container filled with lunar soil collected during the extravehicular activity in which astronauts Charles Conrad Jr., commander, and Bean, lunar module pilot, participated. Charles Conrad Jr./NASA hide caption

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Charles Conrad Jr./NASA

The spacesuit Neil Armstrong wore on the moon during the Apollo 11 mission 50 years ago. Apollo 11 blasted off for the moon on July 16, 1969, and Armstrong took his famed "giant leap" five days later. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Of Little Details And Lunar Dust: Preserving Neil Armstrong's Apollo 11 Spacesuit

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Gene Kranz stands behind the console at Mission Control in Houston where he worked during the Gemini and Apollo missions. Michael Wyke/AP hide caption

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Michael Wyke/AP

Former NASA Flight Director Gene Kranz Restores Mission Control In Houston

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Visitors look at a model of a Saturn V rocket and its launch umbilical tower, which were used during the Apollo moon-landing program, at the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. Fifty years ago this July 20, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin became the first humans to walk on the moon. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

NASA Administrator Jim Bridenstine (from left), Sen. Ted Cruz, D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson and Margot Lee Shetterly, author of the book Hidden Figures, unveil the Hidden Figures Way street sign at a dedication ceremony on Wednesday in Washington, D.C. NASA/Joel Kowsky hide caption

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NASA/Joel Kowsky

A stripe of red dots shows the risk corridor for a hypothetical asteroid strike, part of an exercise this week held by planetary defense experts in which they analyze data about a fictitious asteroid. Landsat/Copernicus/Google Earth/Dept. of State Geographer hide caption

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Landsat/Copernicus/Google Earth/Dept. of State Geographer

This Week, NASA Is Pretending An Asteroid Is On Its Way To Smack The Earth

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