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Mourners stand beside the grave of Gen. Abdul Raziq, the Kandahar police chief who was killed by a Taliban attack, during his burial ceremony Friday in Kandahar, Afghanistan. U.S. Army Brig. Gen. Jeffrey Smiley was wounded in the attack. STR/AP hide caption

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STR/AP

Blackwater security contractors guard Zalmay Khalilzad, then the U.S. ambassador to Iraq, as he arrives at a community sports center in Baghdad in 2006. Jacob Silberberg/AP hide caption

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Jacob Silberberg/AP

Zalmay Khalilzad Appointed As U.S. Special Adviser To Afghanistan

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Afghan President Ashraf Ghani addresses a news conference last month at the presidential palace in the capital, Kabul, where the government was hosting U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo. Rahmat Gul/AP hide caption

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Rahmat Gul/AP

Afghan volunteers carry an injured woman on a stretcher to a hospital in Ghazni province on Sunday. The Taliban assault on the city of Ghazni has resulted in intense gun battles and hundreds of casualties. Mohammad Anwar Danishyar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mohammad Anwar Danishyar/AFP/Getty Images

Maria Toorpakai, a top squash player from Pakistan, is the star of a PBS documentary airing on July 23. Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images hide caption

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Richard Lautens/Toronto Star via Getty Images

Afghan Muslims celebrated the start of the Eid al-Fitr holiday on Friday. An attack on Saturday disturbed the peace, leaving dozens of casualties. Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images

Pigeons fly into the air as Muslims offer prayers at the start of the Eid al-Fitr holiday, which marks the end of Ramadan, at the Shah-e Do Shamshira Mosque in Kabul on Friday. This Eid, Afghans welcomed the start of the Taliban's first cease-fire since the 2001 U.S. invasion Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Noorullah Shirzada/AFP/Getty Images

A view of the luxury Frontier Tower Hotel, built near the ski resort on a Swat Valley peak. Residents often describe their region as the Switzerland of Pakistan because of these views. Diaa Hadid/NPR hide caption

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Diaa Hadid/NPR

Once Ruled By Taliban, Residents Of Pakistan's Swat Valley Say Army Should Leave

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Scholars from Afghanistan, Pakistan and Indonesia attended a conference on Friday to discuss stability in Afghanistan. Indonesian President Joko Widodo (center) shakes hands with Qibla Ayaz, chairman of Pakistan's Council of Islamic Ideology. Dita Alangkara/AP hide caption

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Dita Alangkara/AP