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As U.S. Reengages With Cuba, Art Museums Make a Trade

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Veronica Ramirez holds her 15-month-old son, Lora, as she waits in line Monday to apply for a new municipal identification card at the Bronx Library Center in New York. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

New York City ID Could Open Up Doors — And Privacy Concerns

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Coss Marte started selling drugs at age 13 and by 19, he says, he was making $2 million a year. After serving a prison sentence, he founded a "prison style" fitness boot camp. Justin Fennert/Courtesy of Behind the Stache hide caption

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Justin Fennert/Courtesy of Behind the Stache

From Jail Cell To Studio: Drug Dealer Becomes Personal Trainer

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Protesters march through Midtown Manhattan on Tuesday, a day after New York City's mayor called for a pause in the demonstrations. Michael Graae/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Graae/Getty Images

Demonstrators March In NYC After Mayor's Call To Suspend Protests

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Tenant screening companies say the databases they compile, listing people who have been sued by landlords, help identify deadbeat renters. Tenants' advocates say they don't differentiate problem renters from those who were simply asserting their rights. Shell Belle/Flickr hide caption

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Shell Belle/Flickr

Tenant Blacklist Can Haunt New York Renters For Years

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Former Officer: Policing Takes Patience, But Black Suspects Get Little

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An ironworker on the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in the early 1960s. ©Bruce Davidson/Magnum Photos hide caption

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©Bruce Davidson/Magnum Photos

Memories Of An Ironworker On The Verrazano-Narrows Bridge

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A horse-drawn carriage operator waits for riders near Central Park in New York on October 20, 2014. Mayor Bill de Blasio is backing legislation that would ban such carriages in 2016. JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

Eric Garner (right) poses with his children. A grand jury has decided not to indict a New York police officer over Garner's death in July. Family photo via National Action Network/AP hide caption

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Family photo via National Action Network/AP

New York data blogger Ben Wellington sits next to a fire hydrant Sunday in Brooklyn, N.Y. His investigation into the city's parking ticket data found that two Lower Manhattan hydrants on consecutive blocks in Manhattan generated $55,000 a year for the city — off of cars that appeared to be parked legally. RIchard Villa/OZY hide caption

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RIchard Villa/OZY