New York City New York City

Protesters march through Midtown Manhattan on Tuesday, a day after New York City's mayor called for a pause in the demonstrations. Michael Graae/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Michael Graae/Getty Images

Demonstrators March In NYC After Mayor's Call To Suspend Protests

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/372784442/372789837" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Tenant screening companies say the databases they compile, listing people who have been sued by landlords, help identify deadbeat renters. Tenants' advocates say they don't differentiate problem renters from those who were simply asserting their rights. Shell Belle/Flickr hide caption

toggle caption
Shell Belle/Flickr

Tenant Blacklist Can Haunt New York Renters For Years

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/367833532/370714648" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Former Officer: Policing Takes Patience, But Black Suspects Get Little

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/370264858/370264859" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An ironworker on the Verrazano-Narrows Bridge in the early 1960s. ©Bruce Davidson/Magnum Photos hide caption

toggle caption
©Bruce Davidson/Magnum Photos

Memories Of An Ironworker On The Verrazano-Narrows Bridge

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/370074170/370264961" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A horse-drawn carriage operator waits for riders near Central Park in New York on October 20, 2014. Mayor Bill de Blasio is backing legislation that would ban such carriages in 2016. JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images

Eric Garner (right) poses with his children. A grand jury has decided not to indict a New York police officer over Garner's death in July. Family photo via National Action Network/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Family photo via National Action Network/AP

New York data blogger Ben Wellington sits next to a fire hydrant Sunday in Brooklyn, N.Y. His investigation into the city's parking ticket data found that two Lower Manhattan hydrants on consecutive blocks in Manhattan generated $55,000 a year for the city — off of cars that appeared to be parked legally. RIchard Villa/OZY hide caption

toggle caption
RIchard Villa/OZY

Seventeen-year-old Jairo Gomez lives in a one-bedroom apartment with eight other family members. His school attendance has suffered because he often has to stay home to babysit his younger siblings. Emily Kwong/WNYC hide caption

toggle caption
Emily Kwong/WNYC

7 Kids, 1 Apartment: What Poverty Means To This Teen

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/364062673/365016042" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A woman on the L train in New York City last week covers her face, fearful because a doctor with Ebola rode the train days earlier. Epidemiologists say people on the subway were not at risk. Stephen Nessen /WNYC hide caption

toggle caption
Stephen Nessen /WNYC

New York's Disease Detectives Hit The Street In Search Of Ebola

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/359323578/359403543" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The media is all over this story: Ebola in NYC! Don Weiss, a doctor with the New York City Health Department, faces microphones outside the bowling alley visited by the physician who tested positive for the virus. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

toggle caption
John Minchillo/AP

An inmate at Rikers Island juvenile detention facility carries a plastic fork behind his back as he walks with other inmates. A recent report found that juvenile detainees are subjected to routine violence, both by other inmates and by correction officers. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Julie Jacobson/AP

'Culture Of Violence' Pervades Rikers' Juvenile Facilities

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/356165968/356302590" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript