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For Barrow Street Theatre, pie shells are baked and filled with the chicken and vegetables, cooked in a little white truffle butter, then sprinkled with truffle zest. Joan Marcus hide caption

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Joan Marcus

In NYC, 'Sweeney Todd' Baker Serves Up Some Bloody Good Pies

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Blind Sheikh Omar Abdel Rahman sits and prays inside an iron cage at the opening of a court session in Cairo in 1989. Mike Nelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mike Nelson/AFP/Getty Images

Omar Abdel-Rahman, Radical Cleric Connected To 1993 World Trade Center Bombing, Dies

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The disappearance of Etan Patz made national headlines, as police and his family called for answers. The boy's mother, Julie Patz, is seen here in 1981 during an appearance on NBC's Today show. Dave Pickoff/AP hide caption

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Dave Pickoff/AP

People attend an afternoon rally in New York City's Battery Park to protest President Donald Trump's new immigration policies. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

New York City has issued roughly 900,000 ID cards since last year. Office of the Mayor of New York City hide caption

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Office of the Mayor of New York City

City Officials Go To Court To Protect New Yorkers With Municipal IDs

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Colin Ozeki, a high school student with autism, is on track to graduate this year from Millennium Brooklyn High School with an advanced diploma. Amy Pearl/WNYC hide caption

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Amy Pearl/WNYC

Getting Students With Autism Through High School, To College And Beyond

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Nicole Xu for NPR

Born In The U.S., Raised In China: 'Satellite Babies' Have A Hard Time Coming Home

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Susan Frawley Eisele holds her 6-week-old son, Albert Jr., at the Waldorf Astoria hotel in New York City in 1936. Eisele, of Blue Earth, Minn., won an essay contest with Country Home magazine and was named best American rural correspondent of 1936. Courtesy of Kitty Eisele hide caption

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Courtesy of Kitty Eisele

When Mrs. Eisele Took Manhattan: Big City Failed To Awe Minnesota Journalist

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New York Governor Andrew Cuomo (R) visits the scene of an explosion on West 23rd Street Sept. 18, 2016 in New York. An explosion rocked one of the most fashionable neighborhoods of New York, injuring 29 people, one seriously, a week after America's financial capital marked the 15th anniversary of the 9/11 attacks. Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Bryan R. Smith/AFP/Getty Images

A commemoration ceremony is held for the victims of the Sept. 11 terrorist attacks on Sunday at the National September 11 Memorial and Museum in New York City. Spencer Platt /Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt /Getty Images

Russell Mercer replaces old U.S. flags with new ones at the Flushing World Trade Center Memorial at Flushing Cemetery in New York City. His stepson, Scott Kopytko, was killed on Sept. 11. Alex Welsh for NPR hide caption

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Alex Welsh for NPR

Sept. 11 Families Face 'Strange, Empty Void' Without Victims' Remains

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