New York City New York City
Stories About

New York City

Eight people have been killed in New York while riding their bikes since June, bringing the total number of deaths so far this year to 19. Above a memorial to one of the cyclists killed, Robyn Hightman. Aubri Juhasz/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Aubri Juhasz/NPR

In NYC, Cycling Deaths Increase But Gears Turn Slowly On Safety Measures

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/751218425/751236083" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

From left, U.S. Soccer Federation President Carlos Cordeiro, New York Mayor Bill de Blasio and soccer players Megan Rapinoe, Alex Morgan and Ashlyn Harris celebrate the U.S. women's soccer team's world championship in New York, during a ticker tape parade along the Canyon of Heroes Wednesday. Craig Ruttle/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Craig Ruttle/AP

An ice cream truck makes its way through the streets of Brooklyn, New York, in June 2007. On Wednesday, city officials announced they have begun to seize vehicles involved in an alleged scam to avoid nearly $4.5 million in traffic fines. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Bebeto Matthews/AP

Traffic moves along 42nd Street in Midtown Manhattan on Jan. 25, 2018. After decades of efforts by transportation advocates, the state of New York has approved a plan to add congestion pricing to the city, charging drivers who enter a designated zone of Manhattan. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

City Dwellers Don't Like The Idea Of Congestion Pricing — But They Get Over It

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/720805841/721172265" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Pedestrians walk in Brooklyn on an unseasonably warm afternoon in February 2017, when temperatures reached near 60 degrees. To take action against climate change, New York City is requiring large buildings to retrofit their structures to improve energy efficiency. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Spencer Platt/Getty Images

To Fight Climate Change, New York City Will Push Skyscrapers To Slash Emissions

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/716284808/716288241" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A Brooklyn judge on Thursday upheld a mandatory measles vaccinations order. On the same day, the United Talmudical Academy, pictured here, reopened after being closed for failing to comply with a Health Department order that required it to provide medical and attendance records amid a measles outbreak. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Wenig/AP

A nurse prepares the measles, mumps and rubella vaccine at the Rockland County Health Department in Haverstraw, N.Y., earlier this month. Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Johannes Eisele/AFP/Getty Images

More than 285 cases of the measles have been reported in New York since October. Nearly all are associated with people who live in the Williamsburg or Borough Park neighborhoods of Brooklyn. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Seth Wenig/AP

After gaining approval from state lawmakers, New York will become the first U.S. city to levy fees on motorists who drive on some of its most congested streets. Here, traffic fills 42nd Street in Midtown Manhattan in January 2018. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Freelancers Hub in Brooklyn offers classes, shared office space, tax and legal advice for free. Kholood Eid for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Kholood Eid for NPR

This New Program Aims To Train The Growing Freelance Workforce

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/681807327/682160348" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The night sky over New York City turned bright blue Thursday night, the result of a sustained electrical arc flash at an Astoria, Queens, power plant, according to Con Edison. Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jeenah Moon/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Google says it will lease office space at three spots in the West Village to create a new campus for thousands of workers in New York City. Here, a pedestrian passes by 345 Hudson Street, one of the buildings Google will be using. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A view of New York City from the Empire State Building on Tuesday. The city just had its first weekend without a single shooting in at least 25 years. Theo Wargo/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Theo Wargo/Getty Images