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New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio signs an executive order raising the city's living wage law Tuesday. The move will require some employers to pay their employees between $11.50 and $13.13 an hour, depending on whether the employee receives benefits. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Iraqi Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi speaks during a bilateral meeting with President Barack Obama at the United Nations on Wednesday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

Paula and Ron Faber walk their dog Millie in 2009, between cancer diagnoses. Shelley Seccombe/Shelley Seccombe hide caption

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Shelley Seccombe/Shelley Seccombe

Terminally Ill, But Constantly Hospitalized

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Artist Gilbert Baker, designer of the Rainbow Flag, is draped with the flag while holding a banner that reads "Boycott Homophobia" before the start of the St. Patrick's Day parade in March in New York. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

New Yorkers can take city-run classes to learn how to make their homes and businesses less attractive to these guys. Ludovic Bertron/Flickr hide caption

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Ludovic Bertron/Flickr

Rats! New York City Tries To Drain Rodent 'Reservoirs'

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Lower-income residents may find affordable housing hard to come by in Manhattan. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

New York Skyscraper's Separate 'Poor Door' Called A Disgrace

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Outside New York City Hall, a policeman watches a protest against racial disparities in marijuana arrests. The majority of those arrested are black or Latino, even though those groups are not more likely to smoke pot. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Brooklyn DA Shifts Stance On Pot, But That Won't Impact NYPD

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The NYPD recently launched a study into what's causing a rise in shootings in the city. Commissioner William Bratton says it will examine a lot of factors, not just stop-and-frisk. Andrew Burton/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Burton/Getty Images

Top NYPD Cop: Stop-And-Frisk Is Not 'The Problem Or The Solution'

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Raymond Santana (right), Kevin Richardson and Yusef Salaamat attend a rally in Foley Square, New York City, in January 2013. The three men were among the "Central Park Five," who were convicted of beating and raping a white woman but have since been exonerated. Frank Franklin II/AP hide caption

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Frank Franklin II/AP

A little girl on her way to school Thursday in New York City. Mayor Bill de Blasio and his aides have come under fire for not closing the city's schools before a winter storm hit. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Outgoing New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg speaks during an August news conference after officially opening the new Hunter's Point South Waterfront Park in Queens. John Minchillo/AP hide caption

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John Minchillo/AP

New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg holds a 64-ounce cup, as Lucky's Cafe owner Greg Anagnostopoulos stands behind him during a news conference at the cafe in New York. Seth Wenig/AP hide caption

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Seth Wenig/AP

New York City's Bloomberg Leaves Mixed Results On Health

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