Atlantic Atlantic

Scallop fishermen discard their bycatch near Montauk, N.Y. These waters are some of the most productive fishing grounds on the Eastern Seaboard. Jon Kalish for NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Jon Kalish for NPR

Fish market workers in Jersey City, N.J., prepare a bluefin tuna for shipment to some of New York's top sushi restaurants. Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Emmanuel Dunand/AFP/Getty Images

Washington has eight Atlantic salmon net pens. There are two types: commercial net pens for raising Atlantic salmon and enhancement net pens for wild salmon that will eventually be released. Robert F. Bukaty/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Robert F. Bukaty/AP

Aboard the fishing vessel Marathon, Nicholas Cooke (left) and Nathan Cultee unload 16 farm-raised Atlantic salmon into a container on Tuesday in Bellingham, Wash. Megan Farmer /KUOW hide caption

toggle caption
Megan Farmer /KUOW

Hervé Zarka uses a tool called a simoussi to rake up salt in his marshland on the island of Noirmoutier in France. He says there are many minerals in natural sea salt, such as magnesium and potassium, that aren't in industrial salt. Eleanor Beardsley/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Eleanor Beardsley/NPR

Harvesting Salt By Hand Is Making A Comeback In France

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/545435031/545435032" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Psychologist Jean Twenge says smartphones have brought about dramatic shifts in behavior among the generation of children who grew up with the devices. Image Source/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Image Source/Getty Images

How Smartphones Are Making Kids Unhappy

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/542016165/542087124" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The author (second from left) with his parents, siblings and Lola. Courtesy of the Tizon family hide caption

toggle caption
Courtesy of the Tizon family

In Telling Lola's Story, A Journalist Reveals A Family Secret

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/528515935/528570808" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript