Lebanon Lebanon

Garbage lies north of Beirut in 2017, after it washed away from a nearby seaside dump. Beirut and its suburbs generate some 3,000 tons of garbage per day. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images

Environmentalists Warn Of Mediterranean Pollution From Lebanon Land Reclamation

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Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri attends a Cabinet meeting at the presidential palace of Baabda, southeast of Beirut, on Tuesday. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images

In this photo from Lebanon's government, Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri reads a statement after his meeting with Lebanon's president, Michel Aoun, in Baabda, Lebanon, on Wednesday. Dalati Nohra/AP hide caption

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Dalati Nohra/AP

A poster of resigned Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri with Arabic that read, "We are all with you," hangs on a street in Beirut, Lebanon, on Monday. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Supporters of Saad Hariri hold up placards demanding his return from Saudi Arabia at the starting line of Beirut's annual marathon on Sunday. Rumors have swirled that he is being held in Saudi Arabia against his will. Anwar Amro/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Anwar Amro/AFP/Getty Images

After Lebanese Leader's TV Appearance, Doubts Grow About His Future — And Lebanon's

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In his first live interview since suddenly resigning, Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri denied rumors that Saudi Arabia was holding him against his will. He said he planned to return to his country within days. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Lebanese Prime Minister Saad Hariri, who resigned last week in a televised speech from the Saudi capital, Riyadh, stares out from a poster on the side of a road in Tripoli, Lebanon. Ibrahim Chalhoub/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ibrahim Chalhoub/AFP/Getty Images

Syrian refugee children play at an informal refugee camp in Lebanon's Bekaa valley. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

In Lebanon, Syrian Refugees Met With Harassment And Hostility

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In Beirut, an audience listens to testimonies about encounters with the police over homosexuality. The event was part of Beirut Pride week – the city's first. Alison Meuse/NPR hide caption

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Alison Meuse/NPR

At Beirut's First Pride Week, A Chance To Celebrate — And Take Stock Of Challenges

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Maamoul, a shortbread cookie stuffed with date paste or chopped walnuts or pistachios and dusted with powdered sugar, is the perfect reward after a month of fasting during Ramadan and Lent. These cookies are waiting to be baked. Amy E. Robertson for NPR hide caption

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Amy E. Robertson for NPR

A group of students visits the Beirut mansion that architect Mona El Hallak is working to transform into a museum making sense of Lebanon's civil war. Alice Fordham /NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham /NPR

In A Bullet-Riddled Mansion, A Beirut Architect Envisions A Museum Of Memory

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Trombonist and composer Reginald Cyntje was born in Dominica and raised in the U.S. Virgin Islands on a diet of reggae, calypso, classical and jazz. Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR hide caption

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Patrick Jarenwattananon/NPR

A woman works in a factory processing hashish in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley in December 2014. Mohamed Azakir/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Mohamed Azakir/Reuters/Landov

Escaping Syria To Harvest Hashish In Lebanon

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Radwan Mahmoud, a Syrian refugee, works as a laborer on a construction site in Lebanon. He's supporting 12 family members and earning about $16 a day. With a population of just over 4 million, Lebanon is host to more than 1 million Syrian refugees. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Alice Fordham/NPR

As War Drags On, Syrian Refugees In Lebanon Sink Into Debt Trap

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People gather near the site of a twin suicide attack Thursday in Burj al-Barajneh, southern Beirut, Lebanon. The self-proclaimed Islamic State has claimed responsibility for the attack. Bilal Hussein/AP hide caption

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Bilal Hussein/AP