Hawaii Hawaii
Stories About

Hawaii

Hawaiian language activist Larry Kimura led the charge in the 1970s in getting Hawaii's Department of Education to sanction Hawaiian-language immersion schools. The state, however, did not offer any support or curriculum, Kimura said. So they did it on their own — starting with preschool — where kids could absorb the language from the start. Shereen Marisol Meraji hide caption

toggle caption
Shereen Marisol Meraji

The Hawaiian Language Nearly Died. A Radio Show Sparked Its Revival

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/452551172/734436954" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

This photo shows an early-morning view of Halema'uma'u Crater and the Kilauea Caldera June 5, 2018. The volcano is no longer erupting but is still active. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Ocean Ramsey is pictured caressing the great white shark believed to be Deep Blue, a 20-foot-long female shark more than 50 years old. Juan Oliphant /One Ocean Diving hide caption

toggle caption
Juan Oliphant /One Ocean Diving

George, the last known Achatinella apexfulva, a Hawaiian land snail, died on New Year's Day. David Sischo/Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources hide caption

toggle caption
David Sischo/Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources

An aerial view of Hawaii's East Island after it was struck by Hurricane Walaka last month. The island, home to endangered monk seals and Hawaiian green sea turtles, nearly disappeared after the storm. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association hide caption

toggle caption
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association

A tour boat was damaged and 23 people injured when lava crashed through the roof of the vessel off the Big Island of Hawaii Monday. Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Hawaii Department of Land and Natural Resources/AP

Sunscreens containing minerals like zinc oxide and titanium dioxide reflect the sun's rays away from skin and are a good alternative to chemicals that could be harmful to ocean reefs. Photo illustration by Eslah Attar/NPR hide caption

toggle caption
Photo illustration by Eslah Attar/NPR

Many Common Sunscreens May Harm Coral. Here's What To Use Instead

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/624379378/625259873" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Democratic Sen. Mazie Hirono may have a quiet demeanor, but that shouldn't be confused for a lack of toughness. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Quiet Rage Of Mazie Hirono

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/617239314/617799859" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Lava advances west on Leilani Avenue on May 27. U.S. Geological Survey hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Geological Survey

Hawaii's Volcanic Eruption Draws Scientific Interest

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/615486399/615585136" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

An image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows sulfur dioxide plumes rising from Kilauea's fissures along the rift and accumulating in the cloud deck, viewed from a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory overflight on Wednesday. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Activity at Halema'uma'u Crater has increased to include the nearly continuous emission of ash with intermittent stronger pulses at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. This photo was made at around 9 a.m. local time Tuesday. U.S. Geological Survey/AP hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Geological Survey/AP

Severe ground cracks associated with what's known as Fissure 14 are seen in a burned-out landscape in Leilani Estates near the town of Pahoa, Hawaii, on Wednesday. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Scientists say the lava from Kilauea's new eruption may continue to flow for months or even years. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Days, Weeks, Years? Scientists Say Hawaii Volcano Eruption Has No End In Sight

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/609503580/609650317" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A lava flow moves on Makamae Street in the Leilani Estates subdivision on Sunday, following an eruption by Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. The governor of Hawaii has declared a local state of emergency and some 1,700 residents have been ordered to flee. U.S. Geological Survey/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
U.S. Geological Survey/Getty Images

In this handout photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava from a fissure slowly rolls down the street on Saturday in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii after the eruption of the Kilauea volcano last week. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Handout/Getty Images