Hawaii Hawaii

Democratic Sen. Mazie Hirono may have a quiet demeanor, but that shouldn't be confused for a lack of toughness. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

The Quiet Rage Of Mazie Hirono

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Lava advances west on Leilani Avenue on May 27. U.S. Geological Survey hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey

Hawaii's Volcanic Eruption Draws Scientific Interest

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An image provided by the U.S. Geological Survey shows sulfur dioxide plumes rising from Kilauea's fissures along the rift and accumulating in the cloud deck, viewed from a Hawaiian Volcano Observatory overflight on Wednesday. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Activity at Halema'uma'u Crater has increased to include the nearly continuous emission of ash with intermittent stronger pulses at Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. This photo was made at around 9 a.m. local time Tuesday. U.S. Geological Survey/AP hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey/AP

Severe ground cracks associated with what's known as Fissure 14 are seen in a burned-out landscape in Leilani Estates near the town of Pahoa, Hawaii, on Wednesday. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Scientists say the lava from Kilauea's new eruption may continue to flow for months or even years. U.S. Geological Survey via AP hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey via AP

Days, Weeks, Years? Scientists Say Hawaii Volcano Eruption Has No End In Sight

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A lava flow moves on Makamae Street in the Leilani Estates subdivision on Sunday, following an eruption by Hawaii's Kilauea volcano. The governor of Hawaii has declared a local state of emergency and some 1,700 residents have been ordered to flee. U.S. Geological Survey/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey/Getty Images

In this handout photo provided by the U.S. Geological Survey, lava from a fissure slowly rolls down the street on Saturday in the Leilani Estates subdivision near Pahoa, Hawaii after the eruption of the Kilauea volcano last week. Handout/Getty Images hide caption

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Handout/Getty Images

A new lava vent opened up on a residential street in the Leilani Estates neighborhood near Kīlauea volcano Friday morning. Spatter was being thrown nearly 100 feet high at the time the photo was made. U.S. Geological Survey hide caption

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U.S. Geological Survey

Much of the inner reef at Oahu's Hanauma Bay is dead after decades of tourism. The state may sign a law banning over-the-counter sunscreens believed to harm coral. Caleb Jones/AP hide caption

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Caleb Jones/AP

An image from video provided on Saturday by the U.S. Coast Guard shows flooding along Kauai's Hanalei Bay, Hawaii. Brandon Verdura/U.S. Coast Guard/AP hide caption

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Brandon Verdura/U.S. Coast Guard/AP

The FCC said Tuesday that the false alert of a ballistic missile sent in Hawaii on Jan. 13 occurred when the worker in charge of alerts confused a drill for a real missile emergency. A highway sign in Honolulu corrects the error. Cory Lum/AP hide caption

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Cory Lum/AP

Hawaii Gov. David Ige delivers his annual State of the State address in Honolulu on Monday. During the address, Ige didn't mention a missile alert mistakenly sent to residents and visitors statewide — but afterward, he acknowledged to reporters the difficulties he'd had with Twitter. Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP

Jennifer Appel (left) and Tasha Fuiava are interviewed aboard the USS Ashland in the South Pacific on Oct. 25. They were rescued after reportedly drifting for months while trying to sail from Hawaii to Tahiti. Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/AP hide caption

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Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/AP

Honolulu police officers direct traffic at an intersection. Honolulu is the first major U.S. city to ban texting while walking in a crosswalk. Kent Nishimura/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/AFP/Getty Images