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The FCC said Tuesday that the false alert of a ballistic missile sent in Hawaii on Jan. 13 occurred when the worker in charge of alerts confused a drill for a real missile emergency. A highway sign in Honolulu corrects the error. Cory Lum/AP hide caption

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Cory Lum/AP

Hawaii Gov. David Ige delivers his annual State of the State address in Honolulu on Monday. During the address, Ige didn't mention a missile alert mistakenly sent to residents and visitors statewide — but afterward, he acknowledged to reporters the difficulties he'd had with Twitter. Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP hide caption

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Jennifer Sinco Kelleher/AP

Jennifer Appel (left) and Tasha Fuiava are interviewed aboard the USS Ashland in the South Pacific on Oct. 25. They were rescued after reportedly drifting for months while trying to sail from Hawaii to Tahiti. Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/AP hide caption

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Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Clay/AP

Honolulu police officers direct traffic at an intersection. Honolulu is the first major U.S. city to ban texting while walking in a crosswalk. Kent Nishimura/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kent Nishimura/AFP/Getty Images

We might all feel a lot better if we saw a view like this, from the North Shore of Oahu, every day. Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images hide caption

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Vince Cavataio/Perspectives/Getty Images

The Supreme Court left in place a lower court's broadened definition of close family members who could be exempt from the travel ban, including the grandparents and cousins of a person in the U.S. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Critics of President Trump's travel ban hold signs during a news conference with Hawaii Attorney General Douglas Chin on June 30 in Honolulu. Caleb Jones/AP hide caption

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Caleb Jones/AP

U.S. Challenges Hawaii Judge's Expansion of Relatives Exempt From Travel Ban

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Hawaii's Democratic lawmakers are criticizing Attorney General Jeff Sessions after he expressed amazement on a radio show that a "judge sitting on an island in the Pacific" could stop the president's travel ban. Above, Sessions at the Department of Justice in Washington on Tuesday. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP