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Martin Luther King, Jr. listening to a transistor radio in the front line of the third march from Selma to Montgomery, Alabama, to campaign for proper registration of black voters, March 23, 1965. Ralph Abernathy (second from left), Ralph Bunche (third from right) and Rabbi Abraham Joshua Heschel (far right) march with him. William Lovelace/Getty Images hide caption

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William Lovelace/Getty Images

Philippe Mora, whose father made life-saving baguettes during WWII, displays his graphic of his father, Georges Mora, and his godfather, Marcel Marceau, making mayonnaise together. Courtesy of NOISE Film PR hide caption

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Courtesy of NOISE Film PR

Joel Touitou Laloux's family owned Paris' Bataclan theater from 1976 until last year, when the performance hall was sold and he retired to Israel. He's shown here on Nov. 18 at his home in the Mediterranean coastal city of Ashdod in southern Israel. Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jack Guez/AFP/Getty Images

From Retirement In Israel, Bataclan Ex-Owner Recalls Better Times

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In Gett, the character Viviane Ansalem wants a divorce but her husband will not give permission. In Israel, if you're Jewish, even if you're not religious, you have to be divorced by Jewish law. Courtesy Music Box Films hide caption

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Courtesy Music Box Films

In Israel, Jewish Divorce Is Granted Only By Husband's Permission

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Sociologists Helen Kim and Noah Leavitt look on during their son Ari's bris. They've worked together to research how kids with mixed Asian-American and Jewish heritage think about faith. The Kim-Leavitt family hide caption

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The Kim-Leavitt family

Chabad rabbinical students Zalman Refson (right) and Yaakov Kaplan sit alongside a Jewish resident of Taylor, Ariz. As roving rabbis, the duo recently went to about 40 tiny towns and cities across Arizona, meeting rural Jews along the way. Stina Sieg/KJZZ hide caption

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Stina Sieg/KJZZ

In The Rural West, 'Roving Rabbis' Reach Isolated Jews

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The medieval town of Pitigliano is perched atop a massive volcanic rock, looking out over vineyards and olive groves. It was once home to a vibrant Jewish community, treated with civility or cruelty depending on who was in charge of the city; now, the town works to preserve and share the cultural history of Italian Jews. Michela Simoncini/Flickr hide caption

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Michela Simoncini/Flickr

Italy's 'Little Jerusalem' Opens The Doors To Jewish History

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