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India teammates celebrate after winning the Cricket World Cup match between India and Australia at the Oval in London on June 9. The team will face Pakistan this Sunday. Frank Augstein/AP hide caption

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Frank Augstein/AP

In India And Pakistan, Cricket Fans Are Gearing Up For Their Favorite World Cup Match

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Bindu Sampath, 52, shows photos of her daughter Nimisha Sampath, now 29, who left India three years ago, after converting to Islam. She and her husband, a fellow Muslim convert, are wanted by Indian authorities for allegedly joining ISIS. They're believed to be in Afghanistan. "Only a mother can know how I am sacrificing," says Sampath." I say, 'God, please help her, please hold her.'" Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

'God, Please Help Her': Indian Parents Agonize Over Radicalization Of Their Children

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Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi is adorned with a garland of flowers by members of his political party at their headquarters in New Delhi on Thursday, following a victory in the country's national elections. Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Prakash Singh/AFP/Getty Images

Villagers attend a campaign rally for India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party in Ghazipur, in the northern state of Uttar Pradesh. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

India's 6-Week-Long Elections Are So Big They've Become A Tourist Draw

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India offers hundreds of symbols for political parties. The flashlight, "lady farmer" and lotus blossom (Prime Minister Modi's party symbol) appear on voting machine ballots for elections this spring. No party claimed the violin, the computer mouse and the nail clippers. Election Commission of India hide caption

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Election Commission of India

Tobiron Nessa, 45, is the only member of her immediate family whom the Indian government recognizes as a citizen. Her husband and five children have all been left off the National Register of Citizens even though she says all have Indian birth certificates. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

Millions In India Face Uncertain Future After Being Left Off Citizenship List

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Members of the Rashtriya Swayamsevak Sangh, or RSS, stand at attention and salute a saffron-orange flag at a morning shakha, or drill session, in a park in suburban Mumbai, India. Lauren Frayer/NPR hide caption

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Lauren Frayer/NPR

The Powerful Group Shaping The Rise Of Hindu Nationalism In India

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Some of the products on sale at Umesh Sonia's boutique in Mumbai include bottles of distilled cow urine, soap made from cow dung, floor disinfectant made from cow urine, under-eye gel and toothpaste made from cow excrement. This is part of a growing retail market in India. Sushmita Pathak/NPR hide caption

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Sushmita Pathak/NPR

In India, Ayurveda Is A Booming Business

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Satendra Das, 80, is the chief priest in waiting for the Ram temple, which has not yet been built in Ayodhya. Furkan Latif Khan/NPR hide caption

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Furkan Latif Khan/NPR

Nearly 27 Years After Hindu Mob Destroyed A Mosque, The Scars In India Remain Deep

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The name of India's Mughalsarai railway station, near Varanasi, was changed last year to Deen Dayal Upadhyaya, for a right-wing Hindu leader who died there in 1968. Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Dhiraj Singh/Bloomberg via Getty Images

India Is Changing Some Cities' Names, And Muslims Fear Their Heritage Is Being Erased

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Jet Airways planes are grounded at Chhatrapati Shivaji Maharaj International Airport in Mumbai, India, on Thursday after the airline announced it was shutting down because of financial problems. Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Punit Paranjpe/AFP/Getty Images

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi speaks with of Yogi Adityanath (left), a Hindu priest who is chief minister of Uttar Pradesh, during a campaign rally on March 28. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

With Indian Elections Underway, The Vote Is Also A Referendum On Hindu Nationalism

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Siddharth Dube, a longtime public health advocate, has written a memoir: An Indefinite Sentence: A Personal History of Outlawed Love and Sex. Hindustan Times/Getty Images hide caption

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