India India

Polina, 37, rests in a hospital bed in St. Petersburg, Russia, in 2011. She is severely malnourished and suffers from numerous diseases, including tuberculosis, hepatitis C and HIV. Misha Friedman hide caption

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Misha Friedman

British Prime Minister David Cameron shakes hands with Gopalkrishna Gandhi, Mohandas Gandhi's grandson, beneath a new statue of the Indian independence leader by British sculptor Philip Jackson, after it was unveiled today in London's Parliament Square. Matt Dunham/AP hide caption

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Matt Dunham/AP

Dr. Kunal Saha (far right) and Anuradha were married in Calcutta, India in 1985. She died 11 years later after being prescribed a dangerous dose of a steroid. Courtesy of Kunal Saha hide caption

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Courtesy of Kunal Saha
Susannah Ireland for NPR

For India's Widows, A Riot Of Color, An Act Of Liberation

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British filmmaker Leslee Udwin addresses a news conference on her documentary India's Daughter on Tuesday. The film, which has been banned in India, was broadcast Wednesday in the U.K. — a decision that has angered the Indian government. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

British filmmaker Leslee Udwin addresses a news conference about her film India's Daughter. India has ordered the film not to be shown pending an investigation into how filmmakers were able to interview the men convicted of the deadly rape of a 23-year-old woman in 2012. Altaf Qadri/AP hide caption

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Altaf Qadri/AP

Monsoon clouds loom over New Delhi, the city at the center of Raj Kamal Jha's new novel. Manan Vatsyayana/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Manan Vatsyayana/AFP/Getty Images

For An Author In India's Capital, 'Hope, In Many Ways, Is Fiction'

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Smoke rises from chimneys of coal-based power plants in the Sonbhadra District of Uttar Pradesh, India. The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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The Washington Post/Getty Images

Young Indians Learn To Fight Pollution To Save Lives

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Rajendra K. Pachauri speaks at the U.N. Climate Change Conference in Lima, Peru, on Dec. 11, 2014. He is stepping down as chairman of the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change. Juan Karita/AP hide caption

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Juan Karita/AP

Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi wears a dark pinstriped suit with his name monogrammed in dull gold stripes Jan. 25 during a reception for U.S. President Obama in New Delhi, India. The suit was auctioned off Friday for more than 43 million rupees, or about $694,000. Saurabh Das/AP hide caption

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Saurabh Das/AP

Modi's Fancy Pinstripe Suit Lands $694,000 At Auction

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A mother holds her ailing son at a special clinic for malaria in Myanmar. Paula Bronstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Paula Bronstein/Getty Images

The World Could Be On The Verge Of Losing A Powerful Malaria Drug

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