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People look on at a celebration of Indigenous Peoples' Day in 2016 at Seattle's City Hall. Seattle began observing Indigenous Peoples' Day two years earlier to promote the well-being and growth of Seattle's Indigenous community. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Columbus Day Or Indigenous Peoples' Day?

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Tour participants listen to guide Katie Merriman (center) outside the Malcolm Shabaaz Mosque as she speaks about the influence of Malcolm X on the Harlem community. Courtesy of Marcus Washington hide caption

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Courtesy of Marcus Washington

Religious Walking Tour Maps Out The History Of Muslims In New York City

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Doyle's owner, Gerry Burke Jr., is selling the cafe's liquor license. The restaurant business has changed, and for Burke, the pub (shown here in 2015) is no longer viable. Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Boston Globe/Boston Globe via Getty Images

Bostonians Lament Loss Of 137-Year-Old Pub And Its Trove Of History

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The Cody Firearms Museum in Wyoming recently reopened after an extensive renovation that included bringing a more educational approach to guns and gun culture. Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio hide caption

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Kamila Kudelska/Wyoming Public Radio

Firearms Museum Focuses On Gun Safety, History And Culture

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People hold portraits of Soviet leader Josef Stalin in December 2018 as they line up in Moscow to lay flowers at his grave. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Amid 'Quiet Rehabilitation Of Stalin,' Some Russians Honor The Memory Of His Victims

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David Brion Davis, seen in this undated portrait released by Yale University, died Sunday at the age of 92. The volumes of his seminal trilogy, The Problem of Slavery, won a Pulitzer Prize, a National Book Award and several other prestigious honors. Harold Shapiro/Yale University/AP hide caption

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Harold Shapiro/Yale University/AP

The long-delayed opening of the House of Fates Holocaust museum in Budapest, whose entrance is marked by a Star of David, is expected this spring. Ferenc Isza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ferenc Isza/AFP/Getty Images

Hungary's New Holocaust Museum Isn't Open Yet, But It's Already Causing Concern

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A man does a fascist salute as he stands next to the tomb of Francisco Franco inside the basilica at the Valley of the Fallen monument outside Madrid. Spain's center-left government approved legal amendments that it says will ensure that Franco's remains can soon be dug up and removed. Andrea Comas/AP hide caption

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Andrea Comas/AP

Spain Plans To Remove Franco's Remains From A Memorial, Angering His Supporters

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U.S. troops wearing new sheep-lined coats march in downtown Vladivostok in November 1918. Robert L. Eichelberger/Rubenstein Library, Duke University hide caption

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Robert L. Eichelberger/Rubenstein Library, Duke University

In Russia, Scant Traces And Negative Memories Of A Century-Old U.S. Intervention

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After speaking at the U.S. Naval Academy's graduation and commissioning ceremony, President Trump tweeted, "To the @NavalAcademy Class of 2018, I say: We know you are up to the task. We know you will make us proud. We know that glory will be yours. Because you are WINNERS, you are WARRIORS, you are FIGHTERS, you are CHAMPIONS, and YOU will lead us to VICTORY! God Bless the U.S.A.!" Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Translated Into 'Trumptalk,' History's Famous Lines Would Look A Little Different

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Japan's first lady Akie Abe, left, and first lady Melania Trump, right, arrive for a news conference at Trump's private Mar-a-Lago club on April 18 in Palm Beach, Fla. Mrs. Trump is set to announce some new initiatives next week. Lynne Sladky/AP hide caption

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Lynne Sladky/AP

Sally Armstrong, who plays the role of ragged school teacher Miss Perkins, stands her ground. Samuel Alwyine-Mosely/NPR hide caption

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Samuel Alwyine-Mosely/NPR

A 'Ragged School' Gives U.K. Children A Taste Of Dickensian Destitution

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Patrick Desbois began investigating Nazi crimes because of his family history. His grandfather was deported to a work camp in Ukraine during World War II but never spoke about what had happened. "So I decided to go there one day," he says, "and that's when I discovered that the Germans shot at a minimum 18,000 Jews, plus gypsies, plus Soviet prisoners. But no one wanted to speak about it." Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Christophe Archambault/AFP/Getty Images

After Documenting Nazi Crimes, A French Priest Exposes ISIS Attacks On Yazidis

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