History History

Seed preservationist John Coykendall, also a trained artist, keeps detailed journals of all of his seed expeditions, something he calls "memory banking." Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

The Big Stories Behind Small Seeds: This Man Wants To Save Them All

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Tape worm pills were once advertised as a way to stay thin. Courtesy of Workman Publishing hide caption

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Courtesy of Workman Publishing

'Quackery' Chronicles How Our Love Of Miracle Cures Leads Us Astray

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"Hydrant: In the Air," 1963 — "It's significant because it shows us. We were not allowed to go to the public pools. So we opened our hydrant and we cooled ourselves off. But when I saw it and photographed it I made it more than just poor people turning on a hydrant. I'm very proud of that image. And it says a lot to my community. Hopefully when you look at my image you don't see poor people." Hiram Maristany/ Smithsonian American Art Museum hide caption

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Hiram Maristany/ Smithsonian American Art Museum

A stage constructed amidst Roman ruins to host the rock opera Divine Nero has led some archaeologists and art historians to denounce what they see as the commercialization of the city's heritage. Stefano Montesi/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Stefano Montesi/Corbis via Getty Images

Atop Ancient Ruins, A Rock Opera About Emperor Nero Leaves Some Romans Unimpressed

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Cabinet-card portrait of brain-injury survivor Phineas Gage (1823–1860), shown holding the tamping iron that injured him. Wikimedia hide caption

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Wikimedia

Why Brain Scientists Are Still Obsessed With The Curious Case Of Phineas Gage

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Fortified dwelling and open air banquet, detail from a mosaic portraying a Nilotic landscape from El Alia, Tunisia. Roman Civilisation, 2nd century. Musée National Du Bardo (Archaeological Museum) DeAgostini/Getty Images hide caption

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DeAgostini/Getty Images

Claire Stewart, author of As Long as We Both Shall Eat: A History of Wedding Food and Feasts, says the white-frosted cake familiar today "is a fairly modern invention." Michael Skoglund/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Skoglund/Getty Images

An Army horse wears a gas mask to guard against German gas attacks. Courtesy of U.S. National Archives hide caption

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Courtesy of U.S. National Archives

The Unsung Equestrian Heroes Of World War I And The Plot To Poison Them

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(From left) Renee Chaney, visitor Louisa Parker, Linda Wertheimer and Kris Mortensen, in the first All Things Considered studio in 1972. NPR hide caption

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NPR

First Episode Of 'All Things Considered' Is Headed To Library Of Congress

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Maia Stern, Adam Cole/NPR

Watch Earth's History Play Out On A Football Field

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