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Larry Mitchell Hopkins appears in a police booking photo taken in Las Cruces, N.M., on April 20. Hopkins made his initial court appearance Monday, on charges of possession of firearms by a felon. Dona Ana County Detention Center/Reuters hide caption

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Dona Ana County Detention Center/Reuters

The Southern Poverty Law Center said Thursday that it had fired the organization's co-founder, civil rights attorney Morris Dees. He is seen here in 2016. Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederick M. Brown/Getty Images

Conservative speaker and Vice Media co-founder Gavin McInnes reads a speech written by conservative commentator Ann Coulter to a crowd during a rally in Berkeley, Calif., in 2017. Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Josh Edelson/AFP/Getty Images

An asylum-seeking boy from Central America runs down a hallway in December after arriving at a shelter in San Diego. Immigrant advocates say they are suing the U.S. government for allegedly detaining immigrant children too long and improperly refusing to release them to relatives. Gregory Bull/AP hide caption

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Gregory Bull/AP

Lawsuits Allege 'Grave Harm' To Immigrant Children In Detention

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Frederick Bell of Larose, La., says he's received no guidance from a public defender on how to fight drug charges from October. Bell is part of a class action lawsuit against Louisiana's public defender board that charges the public defense system is unconstitutional. Debbie Elliott/NPR hide caption

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Debbie Elliott/NPR

Public Defenders Hard To Come By In Louisiana

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Assistant Attorney General Kimberly Strovink, of Massachusetts Attorney General Healey's Civil Rights Division, answers calls coming into the state's hate hotline. Tovia Smith/NPR hide caption

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Tovia Smith/NPR

Massachusetts Hotline Tracks Post-Election Hate

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U.S. Attorney General Loretta Lynch says law enforcement officials know that many hate crimes are not reported in communities across the country. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Advocacy Groups Push For Better Tracking Of Hate Crimes

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Prisoners stand in a crowded lunch line at Elmore Correctional Facility in Elmore, Ala., on June 18, 2015. A trial starts Monday over conditions in Alabama's prisons. Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Alabama's Prison System Goes On Trial

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Roman Ducksworth in uniform. The Army corporal was shot to death by a white Mississippi police officer in 1962. Courtesy of Cordero Ducksworth and the Syracuse Cold Case Justice Initiative hide caption

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Courtesy of Cordero Ducksworth and the Syracuse Cold Case Justice Initiative

Frazier Glenn Cross, also known as Glenn Miller, is accused of killing three people Sunday in Kansas City. He allegedly attacked them at a Jewish community center and a Jewish retirement facility. Johnson County, Kan., Sheriff's Office hide caption

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Johnson County, Kan., Sheriff's Office