Nobel Prize Nobel Prize

Kroto displays a model of his discovery in 1996: a soccer ball-shape carbon molecule that spawned a new field of study and could act as a tiny cage to transport other chemicals. Michael Scates/AP hide caption

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Michael Scates/AP

A Discoverer Of The Buckyball Offers Tips On Winning A Nobel Prize

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The model of a DNA stands on a desk during a press conference to announce the winners of the Nobel Prize in Chemistry 2015 on Wednesday at the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences in Stockholm. Sweden's Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich of the US and Turkish-American Aziz Sancar won the Nobel Chemistry Prize for work on how cells repair damaged DNA. Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jonathan Nackstrand/AFP/Getty Images

Professors Anne L'Huillier, left, Goran K. Hansson and Olga Botner, right, announce the winners of the 2015 Nobel Prize in Physics, in Stockholm, on Oct. 6. Fredrik Sandberg/AP hide caption

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Fredrik Sandberg/AP

The "Super-Kamiokande" neutrino detector operated by the University of Tokyo's Institute for Cosmic Ray Research helped scientist Takaaki Kajita win a share of the Nobel Prize in Physics, along with Canadian Arthur B. McDonald. Kyodo /Landov hide caption

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Kyodo /Landov

Nobel Prize-winning physicist Charles Townes was single-minded about a lot of things, colleagues say. And also a very nice guy. Julian Wasser/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty hide caption

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Julian Wasser/The LIFE Images Collection/Getty

Charles Townes, Laser Pioneer, Black Hole Discoverer, Dies At 99

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French economist Jean Tirole won the Nobel prize for economics Monday for research on market power and regulation in industries dominated by a few powerful companies. The undated photo was provided by the Toulouse School of Economics. AP hide caption

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AP

French Economist Wins Nobel For Work On Regulating Big Business

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A woman in Senegal charges her cellphone using a port in her solar-powered LED lantern. Bruno Déméocq/Courtesy of Lighting Africa hide caption

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Bruno Déméocq/Courtesy of Lighting Africa

The new microscopy technique (lower right) brings into focus details of cell structures never seen before with light. Courtesy of A. Honigmann, C. Eggeling and S.W. Hell, MPI Göttinge hide caption

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Courtesy of A. Honigmann, C. Eggeling and S.W. Hell, MPI Göttinge
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LED Lights Shine In Nobel Prize; Now How About Your Home?

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