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Families of victims of Bloody Sunday, in which 13 unarmed protesters were killed in 1972, marched before the prosecutor's announced charges against a former British paratrooper. Liam McBurney/AP hide caption

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Liam McBurney/AP

Fernando LaFuente did not learn of his death until this week, days after his former team falsely reported it to the Leinster Senior Football League Nicolò Campo/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Nicolò Campo/LightRocket via Getty Images

Protesters gathered Wednesday in Dublin to denounce the Irish legal system's treatment of women who said they had been sexually assaulted. Niall Carson/PA Images via Getty Images hide caption

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Niall Carson/PA Images via Getty Images

Supporters celebrate the result of the May 25 referendum in which voters backed the repeal of Ireland's abortion law. The country's health minister predicts the services will be free when they're offered in 2019. Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters hide caption

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Clodagh Kilcoyne/Reuters

Pope Francis arrives as people gather for the Mass in Phoenix Park on Sunday in Dublin. Matt Cardy/Getty Images hide caption

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Matt Cardy/Getty Images

Pope Ends Visit To A Disillusioned Ireland, Where Church Authority Has Plunged

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Pope Francis arrived at Dublin Airport on Saturday, the first visit by a Pope since John Paul II's in 1979. He is expected to have private meetings with victims of sexual abuse by Catholic clergy. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Pope Francis holds his weekly general audience at the Vatican on Wednesday. Pressure is mounting on the pontiff as more and more church sexual abuse scandals unfold around the world. Andrew Medichini/AP hide caption

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Andrew Medichini/AP

Pope Francis Visits Ireland Amid Church Scandals Across The World

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Activist group Solidarity with Repeal holds a rally calling for abortion rights outside Belfast City Hall last week in Belfast, Northern Ireland. The rally follows Ireland's vote to repeal a constitutional ban on abortion. Charles McQuillan/Getty Images hide caption

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Charles McQuillan/Getty Images

Ireland Voted To Allow Abortion. But It's Still Strictly Banned In Northern Ireland

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Demonstrators gather in Dublin on Saturday, awaiting the final results of Ireland's referendum on abortion. Ultimately, Irish voters backed repeal of the ban — but, as evidenced by their signs, those in favor of repeal were already thinking of what may happen next in Northern Ireland. Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images

Supporters of Friday's referendum to repeal Ireland's abortion ban gathered at Dublin Castle on Saturday. Voters overwhelmingly chose to lift abortion restrictions by changing the country's constitution. Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J. Mitchell/Getty Images

Leo Varadkar, Ireland's prime minister, or taoiseach, leaves a Dublin polling station after casting his vote in Friday's referendum. Varadkar has campaigned aggressively for repealing Ireland's abortion ban. Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images hide caption

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Jeff J Mitchell/Getty Images

Thousands of abortion-rights opponents demonstrate in Dublin on March 10. NurPhoto via Getty Images hide caption

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NurPhoto via Getty Images

Ireland's Abortion Referendum Is Proving Deeply Divisive

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Sinn Fein president Mary Lou McDonald arrives to speak to the media at the Parliament Buildings in Belfast on Feb. 12. She supports same-sex marriage and ending Ireland's abortion ban, but critics warn that she's tied to many of her party's hard-line policies. Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images

A New Leader For Ireland's Sinn Fein, But Will It Be A New Era?

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Beyond ingredients and recipes, Guinness has used aggressive exporting and clever marketing to become a global brand. Jirka Matousek/Flickr hide caption

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Jirka Matousek/Flickr

Behind The Genius Of Guinness, Ireland's Most Popular Tourist Attraction

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British Prime Minister Theresa May speaks during a joint news conference with European Commission Chief Jean-Claude Juncker in Brussels, Belgium on Friday. Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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