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From Her Dad To Her 'Jamish' Roots, A Poet Pieces Her Story Together

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Ireland Softens Under Pressure To Drop Its Corporate 'Duty-Free Zone'

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The Apple campus in Cork, southern Ireland, employs 4,000 people — though its financial benefits are felt across the city. But Ireland's attractive tax laws — which have lured other industry leaders — are now under scrutiny. Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Paul Faith/AFP/Getty Images

U.S. Tech Firms See Green As They Set Up Shop In Low-Tax Ireland

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Not-so-authentic Irish: a Celtic knot tattoo. Tattoo parlors in Ireland say almost all the customers requesting this are American. Christa Burns/Flickr hide caption

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Christa Burns/Flickr

The American Origins Of The Not-So-Traditional Celtic Knot Tattoo

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Leinster House is home to the upper house of the Irish parliament. Some members are calling for an investigation into children's deaths and burials at church-run homes. Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images

Tech companies around the world have set up shop in the financial district in Dublin, Ireland. Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Peter Muhly/AFP/Getty Images

Plant pathologists sequenced the genome of 19th century potato specimens like this one from London's Kew Gardens herbarium, collected during the height of the Irish famine in 1847. Marco Thines/Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung hide caption

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Marco Thines/Senckenberg Gesellschaft für Naturforschung