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Why NRA Infiltrator Maria Butina Decided To Help Government Investigations

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Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko speaks to soldiers during a visit to a military base in Chernihiv region, Ukraine, on Wednesday. Russia and Ukraine traded blame after Russian border guards on Sunday opened fire on three Ukrainian navy vessels and eventually seized them and their crews. The incident put the two countries on a war footing and raised international concern. Mykola Lazarenko/Presidential Press Service via AP hide caption

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Mykola Lazarenko/Presidential Press Service via AP

Russia is sending a new division of S-400 Triumf surface-to-air missile systems to Crimea, in a new sign of heightened tensions. Here, one of the systems is carried during the Victory Day military parade Russia held in May. Sefa Karacan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Sefa Karacan/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

The Nikopol gunboat (left) and the Yany Kapu tugboat of the Ukrainian navy are tugged to the Kerch Seaport. Sergei Malgavko/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Sergei Malgavko/TASS via Getty Images

Sirota shows off a wheel of cheese with Vladimir Putin's name. He's been saving it especially for the Russian president, but so far has had no luck delivering it. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Lucian Kim/NPR

In Russia, A Dairy Owner Dreams Of Delivering Cheese To Vladimir Putin

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A woman places flowers at the Solovetsky Stone monument in front of the former KGB headquarters in central Moscow on Monday. Dozens of people gathered there to remember the victims of Soviet-era political repressions. Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Kadobnov/AFP/Getty Images

More than a third of Riga's population is Russian; the rest are Latvian, Lithuanian, Belarusian, Polish and Ukrainian. Russian often serves as a linguistic common denominator in the Latvian capital. David Keyton/AP hide caption

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David Keyton/AP

A New Law In Latvia Aims To Preserve National Language By Limiting Russian In Schools

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Ukrainian film director Oleg Sentsov is seen inside of the defendant's cage in a military courtroom on July 27, 2015. He is currently serving a 20-year sentence. Sergey Venyavsky/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Sergey Venyavsky/AFP/Getty Images

National Security Adviser John Bolton speaks with Russian President Vladimir Putin at the Kremlin on Tuesday. After their meeting, Bolton told reporters the U.S. still intends to withdraw from the Cold War-era Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces Treaty. Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Maxim Shipenkov/AFP/Getty Images

President Ronald Reagan (right) and Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev exchange pens during the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces Treaty signing ceremony in the White House on Dec. 8, 1987. Gorbachev's translator Pavel Palazhchenko stands in the middle. Bob Daugherty/AP hide caption

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Bob Daugherty/AP

The U.S. Consulate building in St. Petersburg, Russia, was closed earlier this year in tit-for-tat diplomatic penalties between the two countries. Olga Maltseva/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Olga Maltseva/AFP/Getty Images

New satellite imagery of a remote Russian test site suggests that the missile may not be working as well as claimed. Satellite imagery from Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Satellite imagery from Planet Labs Inc.

Russia's Nuclear Cruise Missile Is Struggling To Take Off, Imagery Suggests

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The U.S. is sanctioning China's military for buying equipment from Russia that included fighter jets and surface-to-air missiles. Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) is show with Chinese President Xi Jinping, in Russia earlier this month. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The CEO of Berlin's Charite Hospital, Karl Max Einhaeupl (left), and leading doctor Kai-Uwe Eckardt discuss the health of Pyotr Verzilov in Berlin on Tuesday. Verzilov, a member of Russian punk protest band Pussy Riot, was flown to Germany on Sept. 16 after a suspected poisoning. Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

A Russian IL-20M (Ilyushin 20M) aircraft lands at an unknown location. The plane is similar to one that was shot down Tuesday over northwestern Syria. Alexander Kopitar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Kopitar/AFP/Getty Images

Pyotr Verzilov, left, the unofficial spokesperson of the Russian activist group Pussy Riot, along with Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Nadya Tolokonnikova, founding members of the group. Adam Berry/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Berry/Getty Images

Fears about how Russian hackers affected the 2016 election seem to have led a number of Americans to expect a foreign country to affect vote tallies in the midterms. There's no evidence such an attack has ever occurred previously. Adam Berry/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Berry/Getty Images

NPR/Marist Poll: 1 In 3 Americans Thinks A Foreign Country Will Change Midterm Votes

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Workers, photographed in 2016, at the Russian Anti-Doping Agency. An executive committee at the World Anti-Doping Agency is considering reinstating the Russian organization. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP