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Dennis Christensen, a Danish Jehovah's Witness accused of extremism, is escorted into a courtroom to hear his verdict in the town of Oryol on Feb. 6. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

Opinion: Jehovah's Witnesses Cling To Faith Despite Arrests In Russia

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Artificial flowers decorate barbed wire fence as Soviet army troops stop in Kabul, Afghanistan, in May 1988. The Soviet Union invaded Afghanistan in December 1979 to shore up the pro-Soviet regime in Kabul. Douglas E. Curran/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Douglas E. Curran/AFP/Getty Images

Many Russians Today Take Pride In Afghan War That Foretold Soviet Demise

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A Russian sailor checks his smartphone aboard a warship while supervising visitors during Russian Navy day at the Vistula lagoon in Baltiysk, Russia, in 2016. On Tuesday, Russian lawmakers passed a bill restricting service members from using smartphones. Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrey Rudakov/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Paul Whelan, a former U.S. Marine arrested in Moscow at the end of last year, looks through a cage's glass as he speaks to his lawyers in a court room in Moscow, Russia, at a January hearing. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has vowed to launch an investigation into whether officials at the Justice Department and the FBI were plotting a "bureaucratic coup" to oust President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

The GRU, Russia's military intelligence agency in Moscow, is implicated in the latest report released by Bellingcat. The international investigative group says it has identified the third suspect in the poisoning of former Russian spy Sergei Skripal. Pavel Golovkin/AP hide caption

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Pavel Golovkin/AP

Paul Whelan, an American accused of espionage and arrested in Russia, listens to his lawyers while standing inside a defendants' cage during a hearing at a court in Moscow on Jan. 22. Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mladen Antonov/AFP/Getty Images

Suspected U.S. Spy 'Is Holding Up Surprisingly Well' In Russian Jail, Lawyer Says

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Dennis Christensen, a Danish Jehovah's Witness, is escorted from a court room in Orel, Russia, on Wednesday. Yuriy Temirbulatov/Courtesy of Jehovah's Witnesses via AP hide caption

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Yuriy Temirbulatov/Courtesy of Jehovah's Witnesses via AP

Russian President Vladimir Putin center, attends a meeting with Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, left, and Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu in the Kremlin in Moscow on Saturday. Putin said that Russia will abandon the 1987 Intermediate-Range Nuclear Forces treaty, what he called a "symmetrical" response to the U.S. decision to withdraw. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP

Russian troops load a missile onto an Iskander-M launcher during a 2016 exercise. Russia is now deploying missiles to Kaliningrad, its Baltic exclave. Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images

The U.S. And Russia Are Stocking Up On Missiles And Nukes For A Different Kind Of War

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Yevgeny Prigozhin (left) serves food to Russian leader Vladimir Putin during a 2011 dinner at Prigozhin's restaurant outside Moscow. Misha Japaridze/AP hide caption

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Misha Japaridze/AP

'Putin's Chef' Has His Fingers In Many Pies, Critics Say

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