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Saudi Arabia's King Salman and Russian President Vladimir Putin pose for a photo during a welcoming ceremony at the Kremlin in October 2017. Last year, Saudi Arabia and Russia were the world's second- and third-largest oil producers, respectively. Alexei Nikolsky/AP hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP

An ethernet cable connects a router device inside a communications room at an office in London on May 15, 2017. Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Chris Ratcliffe/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Sounding The Alarm About A New Russian Cyber Threat

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Russian journalist Maxim Borodin, who died from a fall from a fifth-floor balcony, had written about crime and political corruption the local Novy Den website. Novy Den/AP hide caption

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Novy Den/AP

Why Do Russian Journalists Keep Falling?

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Young people take a photo in front of the Akhmad Kadyrov Mosque, known as the "Heart of Chechnya," and large letters reading "I love Grozny" in central Grozny, Russia, in 2017. Kirill Kudryavtsev /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Kirill Kudryavtsev /AFP/Getty Images

Vladimir Baranov is still hoping to find passengers for the Man Gyong Bong ferry between Vladivostok and the North Korean port of Rajin, including Russian and Chinese tourists. But he can soon forget about the region's North Korean migrant workers that Moscow says will have to leave. Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images hide caption

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Yuri Smityuk/TASS via Getty Images

Sanctions Targeting North Korea Ripple Into Russia

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Putin (left) and Schroeder attend a test pipeline launch at a gas compressor station outside Vyborg, in western Russia, in September 2011. Alexei Nikolsky/AP Photo/RIA Novosti hide caption

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Alexei Nikolsky/AP Photo/RIA Novosti

Schroeder Putin

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Syrian authorities distribute bread, vegetables and pasta to residents on Monday in the town of Douma, the site of a suspected chemical weapons attack, near Damascus, Syria. Hassan Ammar/AP hide caption

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Hassan Ammar/AP

Representative of the Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons met Monday about Syria's alleged use of chemical weapons in Douma. Peter Dejong/AP hide caption

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Peter Dejong/AP

Buses with U.S. diplomats and their families who have been expelled from Russia leave the U.S. Embassy compound in Moscow on April 5. They were the first of a group of 60 U.S. diplomats who have been expelled from Russia, after the United States kicked out the same number of Russian diplomats. Vasily Maximov/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Vasily Maximov/AFP/Getty Images

Diplomatic Corps In Moscow Shrinks Just When U.S.-Russia Tensions Are At A High

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President Trump had a strong message for Russia in their disagreement over Syria, saying in a tweet, "You shouldn't be partners with a Gas Killing Animal who kills his people and enjoys it!" Trump is seen here in the Oval Office at the White House on Tuesday. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Trump Tells Russia: 'Get Ready' For U.S. Missiles Striking Syria

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This image released early Sunday by the Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets shows a child receiving oxygen through respirators following an alleged poison gas attack in the rebel-held town of Douma, near Damascus, Syria. Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets via AP hide caption

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Syrian Civil Defense White Helmets via AP