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The U.S. Consulate building in St. Petersburg, Russia, was closed earlier this year in tit-for-tat diplomatic penalties between the two countries. Olga Maltseva/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Olga Maltseva/AFP/Getty Images

New satellite imagery of a remote Russian test site suggests that the missile may not be working as well as claimed. Satellite imagery from Planet Labs Inc. hide caption

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Satellite imagery from Planet Labs Inc.

Russia's Nuclear Cruise Missile Is Struggling To Take Off, Imagery Suggests

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The U.S. is sanctioning China's military for buying equipment from Russia that included fighter jets and surface-to-air missiles. Russian President Vladimir Putin (right) is show with Chinese President Xi Jinping, in Russia earlier this month. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

The CEO of Berlin's Charite Hospital, Karl Max Einhaeupl (left), and leading doctor Kai-Uwe Eckardt discuss the health of Pyotr Verzilov in Berlin on Tuesday. Verzilov, a member of Russian punk protest band Pussy Riot, was flown to Germany on Sept. 16 after a suspected poisoning. Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images

A Russian IL-20M (Ilyushin 20M) aircraft lands at an unknown location. The plane is similar to one that was shot down Tuesday over northwestern Syria. Alexander Kopitar/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Kopitar/AFP/Getty Images

Pyotr Verzilov, left, the unofficial spokesperson of the Russian activist group Pussy Riot, along with Maria Alyokhina and Nadezhda Nadya Tolokonnikova, founding members of the group. Adam Berry/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Berry/Getty Images

Fears about how Russian hackers affected the 2016 election seem to have led a number of Americans to expect a foreign country to affect vote tallies in the midterms. There's no evidence such an attack has ever occurred previously. Adam Berry/Getty Images hide caption

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Adam Berry/Getty Images

NPR/Marist Poll: 1 In 3 Americans Thinks A Foreign Country Will Change Midterm Votes

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Workers, photographed in 2016, at the Russian Anti-Doping Agency. An executive committee at the World Anti-Doping Agency is considering reinstating the Russian organization. Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP hide caption

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Alexander Zemlianichenko/AP

Spiez Laboratory is believed to have been involved with the analysis of chemical agents used in the U.K. It was allegedly targeted by Russian agents earlier this year. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin says two men identified by British police as suspects in the poisoning of a former KGB agent and his daughter are private citizens, not government agents. Scotland Yard released photos of the men last week. U.K. Metropolitan Police hide caption

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U.K. Metropolitan Police

An offshore installation barge welds segments of the Nord Stream 2 pipeline, to be laid on the seabed near Lubmin on Germany's Baltic coast. Esme Nicholson/NPR hide caption

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Esme Nicholson/NPR

In Germany, Construction Has Begun On Controversial New Russian Gas Pipeline

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Chinese soldiers display armored vehicles during multinational exercises at the Chebarkul tank range in Russia. Lucian Kim/NPR hide caption

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Lucian Kim/NPR

Russia's Multinational Military Exercise Last Week Was A Dry Run For Bigger War Games

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Vladimir Kara-Murza pays his respect for late Sen. John McCain. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Opinion: A Bond Beyond Politics

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Russian troops and their Belarusian counterparts await orders during joint military exercises in Belarus last year. Next month, Russia will embark on another joint military exercise — this time on a much larger scale and in collaboration with China and Mongolia. Sergei Grits/AP hide caption

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Sergei Grits/AP