Georgia Georgia
Stories About

Georgia

Huge bands of rain are seen in this satellite image of Hurricane Matthew just before it made landfall in South Carolina Saturday morning. NASA/NOAA GOES Project hide caption

toggle caption
NASA/NOAA GOES Project

Hurricane Matthew Makes Landfall In S.C.; 'Serious Inland Flooding' Reported

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/497167154/497172399" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

Bull River Yacht Club Dock Master Robert Logan leaves the dock after finishing up storm preparations as Hurricane Matthew makes its way up the East Coast, Friday, Oct. 7, in Savannah, Ga. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Stephen B. Morton/AP

Hurricane Matthew Rolls Into Savannah, Ga., Which Is Now Under Curfew

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/497116800/498323026" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

People bike on the beach ahead of Hurricane Matthew in Atlantic Beach, Fla., on Wednesday. Droves of people in the U.S. have begun evacuating coastal areas ahead of the storm, which tracked a deadly path through the Caribbean in a maelstrom of wind, mud and water. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

A motorist who found an Atlanta gas station had run out of fuel calls a nearby gas station Monday to see if they have any left. Gas prices spiked and drivers found "out of service" bags covering pumps as the gas shortage in the South rolled into the work week, raising fears that the disruptions could become more widespread. David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

Herman "Dub" Tolbert, shown inside an American Legion post in Bokoshe, Okla., says the community is left exposed and he's determined to make regulators listen. Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma hide caption

toggle caption
Joe Wertz/StateImpact Oklahoma

Communities Uneasy As Utilities Look For Places To Store Coal Ash

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/484316989/485982327" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript
Isabel Seliger for NPR

A Remote Town, A Closed-Off Courtroom, And A Father Facing Deportation

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/476064078/476205028" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal announces his veto of legislation that major corporations said could legalize discrimination. He said, "I do not think that we have to discriminate against anyone to protect the faith-based community in Georgia." David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

Georgia Gov. Nathan Deal speaks during a press conference Monday in Atlanta to announce his rejection of a controversial "religious liberty" bill. He said: "I have examined the protections that this bill proposes to provide to the faith-based community and I can find no examples of any of those circumstances occurring in our state." David Goldman/AP hide caption

toggle caption
David Goldman/AP

Disney and other companies have threatened to stop film production in Georgia if the state's controversial "religious liberty" bill becomes law. AMC Networks, which films The Walking Dead in Georgia, has also spoken out against the bill. PR Newswire via AP hide caption

toggle caption
PR Newswire via AP

A SolarCity employee installs a solar panel on the roof of a home in Los Angeles in 2014. California's utilities want to pay new solar customers less for their extra electricity and to add new monthly fees. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Like Night And Day: How Two States' Utilities Approach Solar

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/460960961/461675088" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The State Judicial Building in Montgomery, Ala., is seen in 2003. The state's top court ruled against the parental rights of a lesbian who adopted her partner's children in Georgia, and she's appealing that ruling to the Supreme Court. Dave Martin/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Dave Martin/AP

Inmates Ted Stancil (from left), Steven Bass and Christopher Peeples, with their welding Instructor Jeremy Worley (standing in center) at Walker State Prison in Georgia. The inmates are working toward a welding certificate. Susanna Capelouto/WABE hide caption

toggle caption
Susanna Capelouto/WABE

Amid A Shortage Of Welders, Some Prisons Offer Training

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/437589596/438228504" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript