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Former President Jimmy Carter has devoted much of his post-presidential life to observing elections overseas. He is asking GOP gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp to step down from his position as Georgia secretary of state "to ensure the confidence of our citizens." Scott Cunningham/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Cunningham/Getty Images

Voters cast ballots at C.T. Martin Natatorium and Recreation Center in Atlanta on Oct. 18 during Georgia's early voting period. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Pine Knoll Plantation farm manager Mitch Bulger near one of the thousands of pecan trees blown down by Hurricane Michael. Grant Blankenship/Georgia Public Broadcasting hide caption

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Grant Blankenship/Georgia Public Broadcasting

Another Storm Victim — Pecan Groves In Southwest Georgia

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A touchscreen voting machine in Sandy Springs, Ga., during the primary election in May 2018. As the midterm congressional primaries heat up amid warnings of Russian hacking, about 1 in 5 Americans will be casting their ballots on machines that do not produce a paper record of their votes. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

An election official holds an electronic voting machine memory card following the Georgia primary runoff elections at a polling location in Atlanta on July 24, 2018. A group of Georgia voters is suing the state, saying that the electronic machines are not secure. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Federal Court Asked To Scrap Georgia's 27,000 Electronic Voting Machines

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Jimmy Lockett thought he was born in Louisiana but discovered he was born in Memphis when he applied for his state photo ID. Johnathon Kelso hide caption

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Johnathon Kelso

For Older Voters, Getting The Right ID Can Be Especially Tough

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A voter in Sandy Springs, Ga. on May 9, 2018. Georgia is one of 14 states that use electronic voting machines that don't produce a paper trail to verify results, which concerns many security experts. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP

Election Security Becomes A Political Issue In Georgia Governor's Race

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Georgia Republican gubernatorial runoff candidate Brian Kemp goes on stage to declare victory against Casey Cagle during an election night party, on Tuesday in Athens, Ga. John Amis/AP hide caption

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John Amis/AP

This GOES-16 GeoColor satellite image taken on May 26, at 21:30 UTC, and provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), shows Subtropical Storm Alberto in the the Gulf of Mexico. The slow-moving system made landfall on Monday in the Florida Panhandle. NOAA via AP hide caption

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NOAA via AP

Georgia Democratic nominee for governor Stacey Abrams takes the stage to declare victory Tuesday night. Abrams is the first black woman to win a major-party nomination for governor in U.S. history. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Stacey Evans (left) and Stacey Abrams (right), the two candidates running for governor in the Georgia Democratic primary on May 22. They have plenty of similarities: they're both women named Stacey; they're both former legislators in the Georgia House of Representatives; they're both lawyers; and they're both calling for similar progressive policies, such as expanding Medicaid. Asma Khalid/NPR hide caption

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Asma Khalid/NPR