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Patsy and Winfred Rembert in Hamden, Conn., at their StoryCorps interview in 2017. Jacqueline Van Meter/ StoryCorps hide caption

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Jacqueline Van Meter/ StoryCorps

He Survived A Near-Lynching. 50 Years Later, He's Still Healing

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A Moran tugboat nears the stern of the vessel Golden Ray as it lays on its side in Jekyll Island, Ga. The ship capsized last month and is still there on its side, leaking an unknown amount of fuel and oil. Stephen B. Morton/AP hide caption

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Stephen B. Morton/AP

Cargo Ship In Georgia Leaked Oil In Marsh After Overturning

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In this image released by the U.S. Coast Guard, a helicopter hovers over the overturned Golden Ray cargo vessel in St. Simons Sound, Ga., on Monday. Twenty of the 24 people on board had been rescued as of Sunday afternoon, when crews were forced to suspend the search because of safety concerns related to a fire on the ship. U.S. Coast Guard via AP hide caption

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U.S. Coast Guard via AP

The ACLU, Planned Parenthood and several abortion providers in Georgia are asking a federal court to stop the state's new abortion restrictions from taking effect. Here, a woman is seen during protests last month after Gov. Brian Kemp signed the bill. Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images hide caption

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Elijah Nouvelage/Getty Images

Disney CEO Bob Iger speaks onstage at the Disneyland Resort in Anaheim, Calif., on Wednesday. Iger says Disney may stop filming in the state of Georgia should a new, restrictive abortion law take effect. Amy Sussman/Getty Images hide caption

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Amy Sussman/Getty Images

The two men face federal charges of infecting Atlanta's computers with their SamSam ransomware. The suspects have previously been charged in a similar scheme in New Jersey. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

Then-Georgia Secretary of State, and Republican nominee for governor, Brian Kemp attends an election night event in Athens, Georgia. As secretary of state, Kemp was charged with overseeing the election logistics for the election he was running in. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Georgia voters at an Atlanta high school on Nov. 6, 2018. Voting issues became a central issue in the hotly contested governor's race between Republican Brian Kemp and Democrat Stacey Abrams. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

On Monday, 43 alleged associates of the Ghost Face Gangsters were indicted on federal charges related to drug trafficking and firearms possessions throughout eastern Georgia and beyond. U.S. Attorney's Office of the Southern District of Georgia hide caption

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U.S. Attorney's Office of the Southern District of Georgia

Democrat Stacey Abrams isn't backing down from her fight against what she calls voter suppression tactics and election mismanagement after losing the Georgia governor's race. Jessica McGowan/Getty Images hide caption

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Jessica McGowan/Getty Images

Stacey Abrams Says She Was Almost Blocked From Voting In Georgia Election

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Republican gubernatorial candidate Brian Kemp has declared victory in a closely-fought race with Democrat Stacey Abrams that included accusations he abused his office to win the election. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images