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Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens gather for a naturalization ceremony at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center in Alexandria, Va., in August. The Trump administration is planning to include a question about U.S. citizenship status on the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross arrives at a U.S. Senate hearing in June. He added a citizenship question to the 2020 census that has sparked six lawsuits from dozens of states, cities and other groups that want it removed. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) and Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore (right) attend an April event at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C. Gore reportedly has testified that Sessions directed the DOJ not to discuss alternatives to the 2020 census citizenship question with the Census Bureau. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Justice Department attorneys are trying to stop Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and DOJ official John Gore from having to testify under oath for the lawsuits over the citizenship question Ross added to the 2020 census. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, whose department oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Then-candidate Donald Trump holds an LGBT rainbow flag during an October 2016 presidential campaign rally at the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, Colo. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., walks out of a New York courthouse on Aug. 8 after being charged with insider trading. Collins suspended his congressional campaign after the indictment but has decided to resume his re-election bid. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) speaks with former FBI Director James Comey (center) and other officials at the Department of Justice in April 2017, in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Harvard University is facing legal action over its admissions policies, and the U.S. Department of Justice is supporting the lawsuit's plaintiffs. Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren McCollester/Getty Images

The two high-profile people close to President Trump, Michael Cohen (left) and Paul Manafort, were either found guilty or pleaded guilty to multiple federal crimes Tuesday. It was the closest Trump has been tied to potentially criminal acts as president. Don Emmert/AFP and Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP and Drew Angerer/Getty Images

California Attorney General Xavier Becerra (left) and Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti announced the city and county of Los Angeles, plus four other cities, were joining California's lawsuit over the 2020 census citizenship question in May. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Damian Dovarganes/AP

An antenna tower is seen at the Orchard Plaza apartment building in Austin in 2014, the year the FCC imposed a penalty on the building's owners for operating a pirate radio station. Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Google Maps/Screenshot by NPR

Former CIA Director John Brennan at a congressional hearing in 2017. President Trump revoked Brennan's security clearance, claiming he was "erratic." Brennan has been one of Trump's harshest critics in the national security community. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

President Trump looks on as Judge Brett Kavanaugh speaks after being nominated to the Supreme Court last month. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images

What A Justice Kavanaugh Could Mean For The Mueller Investigation And Trump

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Nearly 90 former inmates are buried here on the grounds of the North Central Correctional Institution at Gardner. Before inmates, the state buried patients housed at what once was the Gardner State Colony for the "mentally disturbed." Meredith Nierman/WGBH hide caption

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Meredith Nierman/WGBH

Tempering The Cost Of Aging, Dying In Prison With The Demands Of Justice

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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the census, approved adding a controversial citizenship question to the 2020 census in March. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Democrats, led by House intelligence committee ranking member Adam Schiff (left), have been dueling with Republicans, led by House intelligence committee chairman Devin Nunes (right), for months over the FISA document. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

New York City police are giving the Justice Department a deadline to announce criminal charges in the 2014 killing of Eric Garner. The death of Garner, who repeatedly told police "I can't breathe," spurred protests. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images

Attorney General Jeff Sessions speaks at the Association of State Criminal Investigative Agencies event in May. On Tuesday, the departments of Justice and Education announced that they have retracted documents that advised schools on how they could legally consider race in admissions and other decisions. Ross D. Franklin/AP hide caption

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Ross D. Franklin/AP

People demonstrate in Washington, D.C., on Thursday, demanding an end to the separation of migrant children from their parents. On Friday, the Justice Department said in a court filing that "the government will not separate families but detain families together during the pendency of immigration proceedings." Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm /AFP/Getty Images