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Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, straightens his papers during a 2018 Senate hearing in Washington, D.C. Ross is testifying before the House Oversight and Reform Committee about the census on Thursday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

A composite photo shows Lori Loughlin (left) and Felicity Huffman — two actresses charged in what the Justice Department says is a massive cheating scheme that rigged admissions to elite universities. AP hide caption

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AP

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has vowed to launch an investigation into whether officials at the Justice Department and the FBI were plotting a "bureaucratic coup" to oust President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A Justice Department indictment unsealed on Monday details an alleged conspiracy by the Chinese device maker Huawei to steal the details of a T-Mobile robot. Here, a woman uses her smartphone outside a Huawei store in Beijing on Tuesday. Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images

The Trump administration is planning to ask the Supreme Court to take up a sped-up review of a lower court's ruling that blocks the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, has agreed to testify at a House oversight committee hearing in March about the citizenship question he approved adding to the 2020 census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump, with Vice President Pence, poses with a plaque given to him by sheriffs from across the country during a meeting in September. Trump has campaigned as a strong advocate for law enforcement. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

How Trump Went From 'Tough On Crime' To 'Second Chance' For Felons

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WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange could soon be facing criminal charges from the Department of Justice, according to language discovered in an unrelated court document by terrorism researcher Seamus Hughes. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

How A 'Court Records Nerd' Discovered The Government May Be Charging Julian Assange

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The U.S. Supreme Court has been asked to intervene in pending cases about the legality of the Trump administration's decision to end the DACA program. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross listens to President Trump at the White House in March. Ross' decision to add a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census sparked six lawsuits from dozens of states, cities and other groups that want the question removed. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How The 2020 Census Citizenship Question Ended Up In Court

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Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens gather for a naturalization ceremony at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center in Alexandria, Va., in August. The Trump administration is planning to include a question about U.S. citizenship status on the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross arrives at a U.S. Senate hearing in June. He added a citizenship question to the 2020 census that has sparked six lawsuits from dozens of states, cities and other groups that want it removed. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) and Acting Assistant Attorney General John Gore (right) attend an April event at the Justice Department in Washington, D.C. Gore reportedly has testified that Sessions directed the DOJ not to discuss alternatives to the 2020 census citizenship question with the Census Bureau. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Justice Department attorneys are trying to stop Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross and DOJ official John Gore from having to testify under oath for the lawsuits over the citizenship question Ross added to the 2020 census. Education Images/UIG via Getty Images hide caption

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Education Images/UIG via Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, whose department oversees the Census Bureau, approved adding a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Then-candidate Donald Trump holds an LGBT rainbow flag during an October 2016 presidential campaign rally at the University of Northern Colorado in Greeley, Colo. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images hide caption

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Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images

Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y., walks out of a New York courthouse on Aug. 8 after being charged with insider trading. Collins suspended his congressional campaign after the indictment but has decided to resume his re-election bid. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions (left) speaks with former FBI Director James Comey (center) and other officials at the Department of Justice in April 2017, in Washington. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

Harvard University is facing legal action over its admissions policies, and the U.S. Department of Justice is supporting the lawsuit's plaintiffs. Darren McCollester/Getty Images hide caption

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Darren McCollester/Getty Images

The two high-profile people close to President Trump, Michael Cohen (left) and Paul Manafort, were either found guilty or pleaded guilty to multiple federal crimes Tuesday. It was the closest Trump has been tied to potentially criminal acts as president. Don Emmert/AFP and Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Don Emmert/AFP and Drew Angerer/Getty Images