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FBI Director James Comey says police restraint, born from increased scrutiny in the wake of high-profile police killings and evidence of racial bias, may be contributing to an uptick in violent crimes in some cities. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP

Last October, a 15-year-old student and member of the Tulalip Tribes in Washington opened fire at his high school with a gun obtained from his father. The tribe had issued a restraining order against the father, but that information didn't show up in the federal criminal database — so he was able to buy the gun. Ted S. Warren/AP hide caption

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Ted S. Warren/AP

Crime Program Aims To Close Trust Gap Between Government, Tribes

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Michael Horowitz, the Justice Department's inspector general, testifies before a House committee in 2012 critical of the department's "Operation Fast and Furious." Thursday, he said a legal opinion from the department could block his office from getting documents crucial to his watchdog role. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Republican political operative Tyler Harber admitted in federal court to illegally coordinating between a campaign and superPAC. He was sentenced to two years in prison and two years' probation. Neil Conway/flickr Creative Common hide caption

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Neil Conway/flickr Creative Common

U.S. Sen. Robert Menendez, D-N.J., (right) speaks alongside his lawyer, Abbe Lowell, after being indicted on corruption charges in April. Kena Betancur/Getty Images hide caption

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Kena Betancur/Getty Images