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President Trump and U.S. Attorney General William Barr announce the Trump administration's decision to back down from its push for a citizenship question in the White House Rose Garden in July. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

White House counsel Don McGahn in September. Lawyers for McGahn appeared in federal court on Thursday in a dispute over whether he will have to sit for questions from House investigators conducting the impeachment inquiry into President Trump. Saul Loeb/AP hide caption

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Saul Loeb/AP

Accused of misappropriating billions of dollars, Jho Low has reached a settlement over U.S. claims related to more than $700 million in assets. But he also says he will continue to fight the charges. The Malaysian financier is seen here in 2014. Michael Loccisano/ Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Loccisano/ Getty Images

A year ago a shooter killed eight men and three women, and wounded seven others, at the Tree of Life synagogue in Pittsburgh. Gene J. Puskar/AP hide caption

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Gene J. Puskar/AP

Some Tree Of Life Members Believe Death Penalty For Shooter At Odds With Jewish Faith

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Attorney General William Barr speaks at an event in Washington earlier this month. On Monday, he issued a proposed rule seeking to allow the federal government collect DNA samples from more than 740,000 immigrants every year. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Advocates for safe injection sites rallied in front of the James A Byrne Federal Courthouse in Center City to show their support for evidence-based harm reduction policies, an end to the dehumanization of people suffering from addiction and the opening of Safehouse a safe injection site in Philadelphia, PA on September 5, 2019. Cory Clark/NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Cory Clark/NurPhoto/Getty Images

Nora Isabel Gallegos, left, stands with her daughter Priscila Arévalo in the riverside park in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico, where her husband Guillermo was killed by the Border Patrol seven years ago. John Burnett/NPR hide caption

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John Burnett/NPR

Investigations Of Fatal Shootings On The Border Can Drag On For Years

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President Trump is joined by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (left) and Attorney General William Barr during a July event at the White House announcing that his administration is relying on federal agency records to produce citizenship data. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

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Carolyn Kaster/AP

John Gore, the then-acting head of the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, speaks during a 2018 news conference in Charlottesville, Va. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

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Steve Helber/AP

T-Mobile and Sprint stores in El Cerrito, Calif. The Department of Justice approved the $26 billion merger of the two wireless carriers. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

T-Mobile And Sprint Merger Finally Wins Justice Department's Blessing

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U.S. Attorney General William Barr has instructed the Federal Bureau of Prisons to change the federal execution protocol and schedule five executions. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

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Patrick Semansky/AP

Former acting Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights John Gore speaks at the Justice Department in 2018 in Washington, D.C. Gore and other Trump administration officials are accused of providing false or misleading statements about the origins of a citizenship question they tried to get on the 2020 census. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Suboxone Film strips dissolve when placed under the tongue and are used to treat patients suffering from opioid dependency. The medication is made by Indivior, which was spun off from U.K.-based Reckitt Benckiser in 2014. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

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Charles Krupa/AP

Reckitt Benckiser Agrees To Pay $1.4 Billion In Opioid Settlement

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U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman, who hears cases at the federal courthouse in New York City, on Tuesday denied the Trump administration's request to swap out its entire legal team for the New York-based lawsuits over a potential citizenship question on the 2020 census. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A federal judge has denied the Justice Department's request to change the lineup of lawyers involved in the lawsuits over the Trump administration's push to get a citizenship question on the 2020 census forms. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

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J. David Ake/AP

Judge Says Administration Can't Change Lawyers In Census Citizenship Question Case

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