Justice Department Justice Department
Stories About

Justice Department

President Trump is joined by Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross (left) and Attorney General William Barr during a July event at the White House announcing that his administration is relying on federal agency records to produce citizenship data. Carolyn Kaster/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Carolyn Kaster/AP

John Gore, the then-acting head of the Justice Department's Civil Rights Division, speaks during a 2018 news conference in Charlottesville, Va. Steve Helber/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steve Helber/AP

T-Mobile and Sprint stores in El Cerrito, Calif. The Department of Justice approved the $26 billion merger of the two wireless carriers. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

T-Mobile And Sprint Merger Finally Wins Justice Department's Blessing

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/745544033/745748247" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. Attorney General William Barr has instructed the Federal Bureau of Prisons to change the federal execution protocol and schedule five executions. Patrick Semansky/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Patrick Semansky/AP

Former acting Assistant Attorney General for Civil Rights John Gore speaks at the Justice Department in 2018 in Washington, D.C. Gore and other Trump administration officials are accused of providing false or misleading statements about the origins of a citizenship question they tried to get on the 2020 census. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Suboxone Film strips dissolve when placed under the tongue and are used to treat patients suffering from opioid dependency. The medication is made by Indivior, which was spun off from U.K.-based Reckitt Benckiser in 2014. Charles Krupa/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Charles Krupa/AP

Reckitt Benckiser Agrees To Pay $1.4 Billion In Opioid Settlement

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/740856948/740926119" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

U.S. District Judge Jesse Furman, who hears cases at the federal courthouse in New York City, on Tuesday denied the Trump administration's request to swap out its entire legal team for the New York-based lawsuits over a potential citizenship question on the 2020 census. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Drew Angerer/Getty Images

A federal judge has denied the Justice Department's request to change the lineup of lawyers involved in the lawsuits over the Trump administration's push to get a citizenship question on the 2020 census forms. J. David Ake/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. David Ake/AP

Judge Says Administration Can't Change Lawyers In Census Citizenship Question Case

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/739369416/739440015" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators against a proposal to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in April. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

People gather in front of the Supreme Court last week, some opposing the controversial citizenship question that the Trump administration tried to add to the 2020 census. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mark Wilson/Getty Images

Trump Administration To Print 2020 Census Without Citizenship Question

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/738187530/738267829" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Demonstrators rally outside the Supreme Court in April as the justices hear arguments over the Trump administration's plan to add a citizenship question to 2020 census forms. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., pauses as the House Oversight and Reform Committee votes on Wednesday to hold Attorney General William Barr and Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross in contempt for failing to turn over subpoenaed documents related to the Trump administration's decision to add a citizenship question to the 2020 census. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

toggle caption
J. Scott Applewhite/AP

ACLU's Voting Rights Project Director Dale Ho (center) speaks outside the U.S. Supreme Court in April after arguing on behalf of plaintiffs in the lawsuits over the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to the 2020 census. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Citizenship Question Lawsuit Plaintiffs Ask Supreme Court To Delay Ruling

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/732191078/732270849" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

A newly sworn-in U.S. citizen holds a U.S. flag and documents during a naturalization ceremony in 2018 at the John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston. Steven Senne/AP hide caption

toggle caption
Steven Senne/AP

Protesters gather outside the U.S. Supreme Court in April as the justices hear oral arguments over the citizenship question the Trump administration wants to add to the 2020 census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption
Win McNamee/Getty Images

GOP Redistricting Strategist Played Role In Push For Census Citizenship Question

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/728232221/728419542" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript