Justice Department Justice Department

A copy of Fire and Fury sits on display at a bookstore in Washington, D.C., on Friday. The book was rushed into bookstores and onto e-book platforms because of demand and the threat of a lawsuit from President Trump. Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Caballero-Reynolds/AFP/Getty Images

The Justice Department has charged Zoobia Shahnaz, 27, with bank fraud and money laundering. She allegedly converted money from credit cards into cryptocurrencies including bitcoin and transferred it abroad in support of ISIS. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

Protesters stand arm-in-arm as they block an entrance to the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement office in San Francisco, Calif., on May 1. San Francisco sued the Trump administration over its threats to cut grant money to cities that don't fully cooperate with federal immigration authorities. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Justin Sullivan/Getty Images

The Trump administration is filing a lawsuit to block AT&T's purchase of a Time Warner, an $85 billion deal. Time Warner is the parent company of CNN, a frequent target of President Trump's ire at the media. Etienne FRANCHI/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Etienne FRANCHI/AFP/Getty Images

Justice Department Sues To Block AT&T's Merger With Time Warner

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Police and protesters face off on Jan. 20 in Washington, D.C., during President Trump's inauguration. More than 200 people were arrested and charged with rioting. Jury selection began Wednesday, and opening statements in the first trials are set to begin next week. Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Jewel Samad/AFP/Getty Images

Robert Mueller, special counsel in charge of the DOJ investigation into Russian connections with the Trump campaign, rocked the political world charging three Trump campaign officials this week. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

Special counsel Robert Mueller (left) arrives at the U.S. Capitol for closed meeting with members of the Senate Judiciary Committee on June 21 in Washington, D.C. Alex Wong/Getty Images hide caption

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Alex Wong/Getty Images

After A Day Of Legal Shock And Awe, What's Next For The Mueller Investigation?

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Jeff Sessions is sworn is as attorney general on Feb. 9. There are questions now about the Justice Department's independence. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Anti-Trump protesters chant during an Inauguration Day demonstration in Washington, D.C., in January. A judge has narrowed the Justice Department's warrant for records related to a website used to plan protests. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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Mario Tama/Getty Images

FBI Director Chris Wray, accompanied by his wife, Helen Garrison Howell, FBI Deputy Director Andrew McCabe and Attorney General Jeff Sessions, is administered the ceremonial oath of office by U.S. District Judge Joseph Bianco during Thursday's installation ceremony at the FBI building in Washington, D.C. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Andrew Harnik/AP