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Prisoners stand in a crowded lunch line during a prison tour at Elmore Correctional Facility in Elmore, Ala. A Department of Justice report finds violence in Alabama's overcrowded prisons is 'cruel' and 'pervasive.' Brynn Anderson/AP hide caption

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Brynn Anderson/AP

Justice Dept. Finds Violence In Alabama Prisons 'Common, Cruel, Pervasive'

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The Justice Department sent a letter in support of repealing the entirety of the Affordable Care Act. Here, a sign in support of the ACA in April 2017 in New York City. Kevin Hagen/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin Hagen/Getty Images

Duke University is paying the U.S. $112.5 million to resolve allegations that it violated the False Claims Act by submitting falsified research data to win or keep federal grants. Here, a photo shows the Duke University Hospital in Durham, N.C., in 2008, when some of the fraud was alleged to have taken place. Chris Keane/Reuters hide caption

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Chris Keane/Reuters

Attorney General William Barr leaves his home in McLean, Va., Friday before the Mueller report on Russian interference and potential Trump campaign collusion was handed over to him. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, straightens his papers during a 2018 Senate hearing in Washington, D.C. Ross is testifying before the House Oversight and Reform Committee about the census on Thursday. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

A composite photo shows Lori Loughlin (left) and Felicity Huffman — two actresses charged in what the Justice Department says is a massive cheating scheme that rigged admissions to elite universities. AP hide caption

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AP

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Lindsey Graham, R-S.C., has vowed to launch an investigation into whether officials at the Justice Department and the FBI were plotting a "bureaucratic coup" to oust President Trump. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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J. Scott Applewhite/AP

A Justice Department indictment unsealed on Monday details an alleged conspiracy by the Chinese device maker Huawei to steal the details of a T-Mobile robot. Here, a woman uses her smartphone outside a Huawei store in Beijing on Tuesday. Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wang Zhao/AFP/Getty Images

The Trump administration is planning to ask the Supreme Court to take up a sped-up review of a lower court's ruling that blocks the addition of a citizenship question to the 2020 census. Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Baradat/AFP/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross, who oversees the Census Bureau, has agreed to testify at a House oversight committee hearing in March about the citizenship question he approved adding to the 2020 census. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

President Trump, with Vice President Pence, poses with a plaque given to him by sheriffs from across the country during a meeting in September. Trump has campaigned as a strong advocate for law enforcement. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

How Trump Went From 'Tough On Crime' To 'Second Chance' For Felons

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WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange could soon be facing criminal charges from the Department of Justice, according to language discovered in an unrelated court document by terrorism researcher Seamus Hughes. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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Dan Kitwood/Getty Images

How A 'Court Records Nerd' Discovered The Government May Be Charging Julian Assange

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The U.S. Supreme Court has been asked to intervene in pending cases about the legality of the Trump administration's decision to end the DACA program. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

Commerce Secretary Wilbur Ross listens to President Trump at the White House in March. Ross' decision to add a question about U.S. citizenship status to the 2020 census sparked six lawsuits from dozens of states, cities and other groups that want the question removed. Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Andrew Harrer/Bloomberg via Getty Images

How The 2020 Census Citizenship Question Ended Up In Court

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Newly sworn-in U.S. citizens gather for a naturalization ceremony at the Rachel M. Schlesinger Concert Hall and Arts Center in Alexandria, Va., in August. The Trump administration is planning to include a question about U.S. citizenship status on the 2020 census. Claire Harbage/NPR hide caption

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Claire Harbage/NPR