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Charlie Hinderliter got a bad case of the flu back in January. He spent 58 days in the hospital, underwent two surgeries and was in a medically induced coma for a week. Neeta Satam for NPR hide caption

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Neeta Satam for NPR

Last Year, The Flu Put Him In A Coma. This Year He's Getting The Shot

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A tinted transmission electron micrograph of Chlamydia trachomatis bacteria (light purple/black) inside a cell. Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted disease in the U.S., with more than 1.7 million reported cases in 2017. Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source hide caption

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Biomedical Imaging Unit, Southampton General Hospital/Science Source

Designer Kate Spade is pictured in April 2017 in New York City. Anthony Bourdain is pictured in April 2018 in New York City. Both died in the same week. Left: Andrew Toth/FilmMagic Right: Matthew Eisman/Getty Images hide caption

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Left: Andrew Toth/FilmMagic Right: Matthew Eisman/Getty Images

When Suicide Is 'Buzzing Around'

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Alyson Hurt/NPR

CDC: U.S. Suicide Rates Have Climbed Dramatically

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A pharmacist speaks with a customer at Walmart Neighborhood Market in Bentonville, Ark., in 2014. On Monday Walmart introduced a new set of guidelines for dispensing opioid medications. Sarah Bentham/AP hide caption

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Sarah Bentham/AP

A man shops for vegetables near romaine lettuce for sale at a supermarket in California, where the first death from the E. coli outbreak was reported. Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Frederic J. Brown/AFP/Getty Images

Police said the body of CDC epidemiologist Timothy Cunningham was found along the banks of an Atlanta river seven weeks after he vanished. Foul play is not suspected, but questions remain unanswered. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention hide caption

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Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

The CDC is trying to stop E. coli and other bacteria that have become resistant to antibiotics because they can cause a deadly infection. Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra hide caption

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Science Photo Library/Getty Images/Science Photo Libra

Federal Efforts To Control Rare And Deadly Bacteria Working

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Dr. Garen Wintemute at the University of California, Davis, Medical Center, says of the new authority given to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention: "There's no funding. There's no agreement to provide funding. There isn't even encouragement." Rich Pedroncelli/AP hide caption

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Rich Pedroncelli/AP

Dr. Robert Redfield, named CDC director Wednesday, spoke during the Aid for AIDS "My Hero Gala" in New York City in 2013. Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Aid for Aids/Getty Images hide caption

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Craig Barritt/Getty Images for Aid for Aids/Getty Images

Emergency rooms are seeing a jump in opioid overdoses. Timely treatment with naloxone can reverse the effects of opioids. Spencer Platt/Getty Images hide caption

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Spencer Platt/Getty Images

Jump In Overdoses Shows Opioid Epidemic Has Worsened

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A nurse prepares a flu shot at the Salvation Army in Atlanta last month. The disease is still "widespread" in many places, but slowing. David Goldman/AP hide caption

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David Goldman/AP

For The Second Week, The Flu Epidemic Has Eased

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A doctor and nurse confer inside a room used for flu patients at Northside Hospital in Cumming, Ga. The U.S. government's latest flu report, released Friday, showed flu season continued to intensify, with high volumes of flu-related patient traffic in 42 states, up from 39 the week before. Robert Ray/AP hide caption

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Robert Ray/AP

Brenda Fitzgerald, Georgia Department of Public Health commissioner, and Gov. Nathan Deal respond to questions about Ebola victims at Emory University Hospital and efforts to screen for Ebola in 2014. A report in Politico revealed documents showing several new investments, including in a tobacco company, by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Director Brenda Fitzgerald. David Tulis/AP hide caption

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David Tulis/AP

The Human Rights Campaign, an LGBTQ civil rights organization, projected seven words that were allegedly banned from some CDC documents onto the facade of the Trump International Hotel in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday. Human Rights Campaign hide caption

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Human Rights Campaign

A report from The Washington Post said the health agency was issued a list of prohibited words from the Trump administration. Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images hide caption

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Kevin C. Cox/Getty Images

Trump Administration Reportedly Instructs CDC On Its Own Version Of 7 Dirty Words

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More than 30,000 people a year are killed by gun violence, including 50 killed near the Los Vegas strip last month where this makeshift memorial stands. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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Drew Angerer/Getty Images

What If We Treated Gun Violence Like A Public Health Crisis?

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